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UER Forum > Archived Rookie Forum > CSO health and safety (Viewed 262 times)
Sagetranq 


Location: Caledon, Ontario
Gender: Male


Just passing through

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CSO health and safety
< on 11/13/2011 8:57 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
I've been draining for over a year now in mostly creekwater drains and a few larger river drains, but i'm interested in getting into some brick drains in my area. Upon some research however, it seems most of these brick drains are CSOs, yet I know a number of people who have been through them with no safety equipment without incident. can anyone shed some light and share some experiences with the dangers of CSOs?

MrSivalls 

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Re: CSO health and safety
<Reply # 1 on 11/13/2011 9:05 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
H2S, and low O2 are always dangers when entering any confined space.
With no real time topside backup, if things go wrong, you're most likely dead.

Your security measures were inadequate.
How unfortunate for you.
Lambda 


Location: Rhode Island
Gender: Male




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Re: CSO health and safety
<Reply # 2 on 11/13/2011 9:26 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
It's all about airflow, really. If there isn't air flowing through the place, then there is the danger of gasses accumulating and oxygen becoming scarce. This article (http://www.actionsquad.org/stahl.htm) contains a good description of what bad air is like. If you start to feel the symptoms, turn around and leave.
H2S, or hydrogen sulfide, is extremely dangerous. It stinks like rotten eggs, but soon after you smell it, you lose the ability to smell it. So if the smell goes away, you're not in the clear. If you smell it, turn and get out.
I wouldn't go so far as to say that you're "most likely dead" if something goes wrong. Like anything else we do, it carries some great risks but is possible to do safely.
If you feel the air as stagnant and unmoving, proceed with caution. If you smell H2S, GTFO. If you feel lacking of oxygen, GTFO. And bring a friend.
If you've got cash, and it helps you sleep at night, you can even buy yourself a detector that will warn you of hydrogen sulfide.

Doing asbestos I can
Rinzler 


Location: New Jersey


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Re: CSO health and safety
<Reply # 3 on 11/13/2011 9:30 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Bring a canary

MrSivalls 

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Re: CSO health and safety
<Reply # 4 on 11/14/2011 1:57 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by Lambda
It's all about airflow, really. If there isn't air flowing through the place, then there is the danger of gasses accumulating and oxygen becoming scarce. This article (http://www.actionsquad.org/stahl.htm) contains a good description of what bad air is like. If you start to feel the symptoms, turn around and leave.
H2S, or hydrogen sulfide, is extremely dangerous. It stinks like rotten eggs, but soon after you smell it, you lose the ability to smell it. So if the smell goes away, you're not in the clear. If you smell it, turn and get out.
I wouldn't go so far as to say that you're "most likely dead" if something goes wrong. Like anything else we do, it carries some great risks but is possible to do safely.
If you feel the air as stagnant and unmoving, proceed with caution. If you smell H2S, GTFO. If you feel lacking of oxygen, GTFO. And bring a friend.
If you've got cash, and it helps you sleep at night, you can even buy yourself a detector that will warn you of hydrogen sulfide.


Airflow isn't enough. By the time you feel symptoms, it will most likely be too late. Anyone with you will probably die if they try to rescue you and maybe even if they don't.

Try holding your breathe. You have less time then that to get out have to get out.

Your security measures were inadequate.
How unfortunate for you.
MrSivalls 

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I'll be a-surfin' in yer blood on Saturday night

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Re: CSO health and safety
<Reply # 5 on 11/14/2011 2:03 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by Played
Bring a canary


Yes, they are extremely sensitive and should provide a wide safety margin. Keep it near your face so it breathes the same air as you.
Be mindful that just walking and disturbing surfaces and sludge can release high concentrations of H2S. At higher levels, one breath can prove fatal.

A meter is better. Once the bird dies, so does your indicator.

Your security measures were inadequate.
How unfortunate for you.
UER Forum > Archived Rookie Forum > CSO health and safety (Viewed 262 times)



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