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UER Forum > Archived Rookie Forum > Protecting Camera Gear (Viewed 891 times)
Skich 


Location: Tulsa
Gender: Male




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Protecting Camera Gear
< on 2/26/2013 10:30 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
How do you carry a camera and explore? Equipment: Canon 50d, 28-105mm, 75-300mm, 18-55mm is, 40mm 2.8 pancake, tripod, speedlight. I use a crappy little case logic single camera case, and keep that in my back pack. problem is it has no space to store anything else. With all the exploring gear Im very lucky that none of my camera equipment has gotten damaged. I have been to best buy and poking around the internet for a back pack style camera bag that I could also put my exploring gear in.

Just curious how other explores carry their gear.

OwlsFlight 


Location: Ehn Jay


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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 1 on 2/27/2013 1:39 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
I see a lot of people using the backpack style camera bags with the velcro compartments. Works great if you carry a lot of gear. There's a ton of different styles out there, and some deals to be had on ebay. Even a decent MOLLE bag with your gear in smaller attachment bags would work. It's just nice to be able to cinch everything down if you have to run, climb something, hop a fence, ect...

Exploring the distance between points A & B.
Skich 


Location: Tulsa
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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 2 on 2/27/2013 3:13 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
I took a look at the lower fastpack 250. Its just so damn expensive. But then again I've spent the money on the gear I should spend the money to protect it..

Neurosis13 


Location: San Diego, CA
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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 3 on 2/27/2013 3:16 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
my buddy has this in black: http://www.511tact...s/RUSH-MOAB-6.html

I'm not a fan of "tactical" gear, but this seems to serve him well.

Abandoned not Forgotten 


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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 4 on 2/27/2013 2:10 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
When I bought my Canon T4i, Amazon threw in an Amazon Basics SLR Backpack and 16gb memory card for free. The backpack is very well made and customizable inside with padded velcro partitions. I'm able to fit my camera, 2 lenses, a video light, mic, extra batteries, led torch, led headlamp, gloves and some other odds and ends. I also strap my tripod onto the side of it (it has special straps for this). All in all I am very happy with the bag and it's only $35.99.

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Ricky_from_TV 


Location: Peterborough, Ontario
Gender: Male


I'm going to try and refuckulate it

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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 5 on 2/27/2013 3:34 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Lowerpro sling packs.
http://www.lowepro.com/slingshot
It allows you to access your items without removing the pack and placing it in a sea of asbestos and hold.

When Caught Always, Always Use the Jim trick.
MAVFieldUnit 


Location: Western Washington
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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 6 on 2/28/2013 1:08 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by Neurosis13
my buddy has this in black: http://www.511tact...s/RUSH-MOAB-6.html

I'm not a fan of "tactical" gear, but this seems to serve him well.


I've actually got a black MOAB-10, use it for my everyday backpack and while I haven't used it much for camera gear it's pretty rugged.

EDIT: You can also swing it around for easy access like the slingshot pack in the last post.

[last edit 2/28/2013 1:09 AM by MAVFieldUnit - edited 1 times]

Captain Stormy 


Location: Chicago mostly. Sometimes Minneapolis.
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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 7 on 2/28/2013 1:21 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Lots of SLR backpacks, lots of sling packs.

If you're really set putting your stuff through a lot of abuse, there's nothing like a Pelican Case. I've seen people chimney through flooded mines while floating their camera gear along below them, pushing it along with an extended tripod leg.

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hatsumi 






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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 8 on 2/28/2013 3:25 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by Skich1137
I took a look at the lower fastpack 250. Its just so damn expensive. But then again I've spent the money on the gear I should spend the money to protect it..


to the point. invest in protecting your gear.

drainasaurus maximus
Ricky_from_TV 


Location: Peterborough, Ontario
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I'm going to try and refuckulate it

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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 9 on 2/28/2013 4:20 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Last piece of advice - don't cheap out.
Buy the very best you can afford. I once had cheap camera bags. Bought my current slingshot i've never looked back.

When Caught Always, Always Use the Jim trick.
Therrin 

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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 10 on 2/28/2013 10:04 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by Neurosis13
my buddy has this in black: http://www.511tact...s/RUSH-MOAB-6.html

I'm not a fan of "tactical" gear, but this seems to serve him well.


I'm a huge fan of tactical gear. Not the "looks like tactical" gear, gear. But the actual tactical gear manufacturers. You'll know the difference by the price.

5.11, Blackhawk, Maxpedition, some others. "name brand" stuff.

For everyone who doesn't like 'tactical' gear, you can't refute that it's some of the best hard-use gear out there. Most of the other gear manufacturers can't come close to the ruggedness, otherwise they usually have a 'tactical' line.

There's a reason that certain fabrics and sewing methods are almost exclusively used in the tactical line-up; because they wear so amazingly well, in all kinds of conditions and environments. The two go hand-in-hand.

The "normal" brands of stuff aren't really meant for the kind of hell that the tactical ones can handle. So for the kind of stuff many of us do, there isn't much better at protecting your equipment without tearing and falling apart like the tactical gear can.


Pelican cases are an excellent alternative, but are equally expensive, and extremely bulky & heavy. If you need the ultimate in impact protection and/or waterproofness, then they're the way to go. Accept no substitutes.
For me, for most conditions, they're just too bulky and difficult to maneuver for them to be viable though. It depends what you need and what you're willing to put up with.





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La Cigale 


Location: Paris, France
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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 11 on 2/28/2013 1:52 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
I don't know if it's that I am Australian that I love crumpler so much, or if it is just because they are good solid rugged, durable, stylish bags. But I can't go past them. I have a number of them for different things, from small shoulder bags for just my cam and one lens, to a full backpack.

When thinking about exploring there is a few factors. Usually for the first explore I only use a small shoulder bag with one lens attached, because I am not 100% sure of my surrounds I like to scout the location and look more than photo. Then come back if I think it is safe with all of my equipment to take some serious photos. I usually find the photos from my first explore are kinda crap because I am amazed by every view.

Dirt/ dust getting into equipment and bags is a very real problem. Which is sometimes why I don't like taking my full camerabag into urbex locations, because I need to put it on the ground to get anything out. And if dirt gets into your bag, then it will just play with your equipments the rest of the week which is obviously not the best idea.

My defiantly crumpler hands down for the brand. I believe they have dedicated stores in the US and Europe, and Australia of course.

*** There is a fucking up up up***
Axle 


Location: Milton, ON
Gender: Male


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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 12 on 2/28/2013 4:07 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Here's what I use: http://www.clikeli...m/products/escape/

It's big enough for me to carry at least three cameras with several lenses, tripod on the side, and space for extra stuff. Yet it sits well on the body, balanced, and is a slim profile.

The bag has been through rain, snow, mud, gunpowder smoke and keeps my gear clean and protected.

Of course now I'll need something a bit bigger now that I have a 4x5 camera in the mix.

Celer at Audax
Para la Victoria Siempre Alemanes!
siper 


Location: SF, CA
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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 13 on 3/1/2013 6:38 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
+1 for the Lowepro Slingbag. It's small(ish), easy to access your gear (so you don't have to lay it in a pile of birdshit), and has a waterproof shell. I've been using mine for about 2 years now. It's survived heaps of UE and travel to South America/Africa.

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programmer437 


Location: Columbia, SC; Charlotte, NC
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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 14 on 3/4/2013 5:24 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
I'm going to break tradition here and say that I don't like to "explore" with my gear. I like big cameras, SLRs, camcorders, etc. If I'm with a group, I don't take anything that requires a special bag, since it will just slow the group down. If I want to photograph/film, I plan a way to take everything I need, full size camera case, tripod, whatever I'll need. My friends are aware of this, and we spend alot of time passing equipment over fences and through windows.

At one point I went draining with a Panasonic HVX 200 ($2000 Television camera). We ended up covering it in a waterproof bag, removing the shotgun mics and sliding surefire flashlights into the mic holders, then diffusing them. While it was a single 20lb piece of equipment when we were done rigging it, it was the only thing we had to carry with us and suited for all our cinematographic needs.

In short, explore with the minimums, then plan a return trip with exactly what you need.

"I don't care if you're urban explorers or urban infiltrators or URBAN LEGENDS!"
DrWindyNibbles 


Location: North Orange County
Gender: Male


"For if you forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you"

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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 15 on 3/5/2013 12:18 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
This guy has worked since I got my first camera. I love how light it is. Inside there is a cradle for the camera to sit on, so if it drops, the cradle will absorb the impact. Also it has a high impact rubber nose, which is quite handy at protecting my camera. For lenses, I recommend something that can
A. Fit into a backpack
B. Also go over your shoulder
C. Hold all or more of your equipment.

That pancake lens (Which I am totally drooling over) Should be able to fit at the bottom of the CASE LOGIC SLRC 201 (image below), which is where I put my lens hood.

1.




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Skich 


Location: Tulsa
Gender: Male




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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 16 on 3/5/2013 1:08 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 




This is the bag I ended up buying! It is fantastic. there is a compartment for everything, it has a tripod carrier, and even a space separate from my camera gear to store b&e gear and first aid materials. couldn't be happier with my bag choice.

Skich 


Location: Tulsa
Gender: Male




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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 17 on 3/5/2013 1:09 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Its the lowepro 250aw model. fyi.

MeoW 


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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 18 on 3/12/2013 7:04 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Lowepro also has these which look pretty rad for UE and other activities. I'm into hiking and have been wanting something similar to this for a while, most camera bags kind of piss me off - this one actually looks semi functional.

http://www.lowepro...-sport#prettyPhoto

I don't do magic Morty I do science!
MeoW 


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Re: Protecting Camera Gear
<Reply # 19 on 3/12/2013 7:18 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Digging the bag you posted Skich. I may have to look into that one some more
I like the separate compartment for camera gear, thats pretty much what I've been searching for stash camera gear in one section and everything else in a separate compartment - perfect.

The one I posted has a water bladder system integrated into the bag, which for hiking or backpacking is nice. I'd still prefer a water bottle just easier to clean.

I don't do magic Morty I do science!
UER Forum > Archived Rookie Forum > Protecting Camera Gear (Viewed 891 times)
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