UER Mobile Forum UER Mobile - Not logged in
Home  Search   User Search   Login  Register  
Messages   New Posts   Favourites   Recent Posts   Recent Views   My LDB   My Buddies  

< (1)[2]
UER Mobile > UE Tutorials, Lessons, and Useful Info > Tick Sick 101 (Viewed 16912 times)

post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 20 on 8/17/2017 2:29 AM >

Posted by Cryptomatic


Golly, I guess everyone I know was just really lucky then.


Nothing wrong with that. My one next door neighbor kicked it in 2 or so weeks.
The rest I know weren't as lucky... it's not predictable.

Worse if you DNA code has a particular trait it can trigger an autoimmune disease of the joints which continues even after the bacteria are eradicated.
The protein markers the Lyme bacteria leave on cartilage remain long after the bacteria are gone.
The immune system of some people mistake it for an active infection, attack, triggering swelling and potential for joint damage. This can persists for years but tends to abate in 8-11 years.

Unlike most pathogenic bacteria that are iron lovers, Lyme finds manganese very tasty. There's a lot of manganese in cartilage, thus the reason it tends to attack joints if not treated promptly.
Since its possible for it to disseminate rapidly into the body with some people even prompt treatment may not be fast enough.

You heard early stories of people who to spite massive doses of IV antibiotics, given multiple times still being infected. This was not the case; most were victims of the autoimmune disease described above. Many antibiotics also have anti-inflammatory properties so to them while being treated it seemed to help.

It's possible in some people that it maybe impossible to eradicate Lyme. In the end antibiotics only help the body to destroy the invaders. If for any reason the immune system fails to mop up what's left... it can happen with any bacterial infection. If your that person, life just got a lot harder.

A month of oral Doxycycline didn't stop it with me so we switched to erythromycin for a month. After that would have been the IV antibiotics. The erythromycin therapy worked. Took a few months with no relapse to fully realize it. It's not as clean cut as one might think.
When you are sick for more than 5 weeks with an infection one tends to get concerned....
I was lucky it stopped there.

With Lyme it's always a crap shoot.
One of the things that make it scary.
You don't want any one of these tick borne infections because once infected many things can go wrong...
Prevention is the best cure.


Reply with Quote


post by Cryptomatic   |  | 
Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 21 on 8/26/2017 2:09 AM >

Nothing wrong with that. My one next door neighbor kicked it in 2 or so weeks.
The rest I know weren't as lucky... it's not predictable.


Talk about lucky... believe it or not, I even had a dog who got Lyme, kicked it with antibiotics, and lived to be 16. Usually with dogs it's a done deal.


Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 22 on 8/26/2017 2:40 AM >

Posted by Cryptomatic


Talk about lucky... believe it or not, I even had a dog who got Lyme, kicked it with antibiotics, and lived to be 16. Usually with dogs it's a done deal.


Compared to Syphilis the Lyme spirochete bacteria is less dangerous.
In time many healthy people's immune system would eradicate Lyme. That's not to say that many would not suffer permanent damage even death from it's complications. Some would never eradicate it just like Syphilis.
Both bacteria share similar patterns and stages. Both wuv to bore into tissues of all types including the brain. Lyme however wuvs joint cartilage; a good hiding place.

As for canines I know of at least one other dog that beat it. Absorption issues with the antibiotic just as in humans may make some cases harder to treat. As well as the stage the disease is in. In the last stage it becomes much harder to treat. It may also trigger autoimmune diseases just as in humans; not sure about that though.

Anytime you have a bacteria infection it can go wrong to spite all efforts. This is rare in healthy people but it can and does happen. That's the really scary part too, because until you -know- it's eradicated, you don't know if you'll survive intact or at all. Not a good feeling...




Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 23 on 8/26/2017 3:36 AM >

Yet another tick borne disease, rare but found in Canada and western US states.
It's a nasty one.

Relapsing fever borreliosis
https://en.m.wikip..._fever_borreliosis


Reply with Quote


post by Explorer Zero   |  | 
Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 24 on 8/29/2017 12:05 AM >

heres one more to keep you on the look out for little blood suckers:
https://www.wired....s-may-be-spreading


Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 25 on 8/29/2017 12:11 AM >

Posted by 2Xplorations
heres one more to keep you on the look out for little blood suckers:
https://www.wired....s-may-be-spreading


I mention that little charmer on post #8.
As of now it only applies to the lone star tick; the curse of Texans.
You can't have your pudding if you can't eat your beef!


Remember it's possible to be infected with multiple diseases from one tick. Some them are deadly if not treated promptly and properly.
Most are nasty buggers you don't want to learn about the hard way.
Here's the latest list from the CDC:

In the United States, some ticks carry pathogens that can cause human disease, including:

●Anaplasmosis is transmitted to humans by tick bites primarily from the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.

●Babesiosis is caused by microscopic parasites that infect red blood cells. Most human cases of babesiosis in the U.S. are caused by Babesia microtiBabesia microti is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and is found primarily in the northeast and upper midwest.

●Borrelia mayonii infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the upper midwestern United States. It has been found in blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Borrelia mayonii is a new species and is the only species besides B. burgdorferi known to cause Lyme disease in North America.Borrelia miyamotoi infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the U.S. It is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and has a range similar to that of Lyme disease.

●Bourbon virus infection has been identified in a limited number patients in the Midwest and southern United States. At this time, we do not know if the virus might be found in other areas of the United States.Colorado tick fever is caused by a virus transmitted by the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni). It occurs in the the Rocky Mountain states at elevations of 4,000 to 10,500 feet.

●Ehrlichiosis is transmitted to humans by the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found primarily in the southcentral and eastern U.S.Heartland virus cases have been identified in the Midwestern and southern United States. Studies suggest that Lone Star ticks can transmit the virus. It is unknown if the virus may be found in other areas of the U.S.Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern U.S. and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.

●Powassan disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the groundhog tick (Ixodes cookei). Cases have been reported primarily from northeastern states and the Great Lakes region.

●Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis is transmitted to humans by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatumRocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is transmitted by the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sangunineus) in the U.S. The brown dog tick and other tick species are associated with RMSF in Central and South America.

●STARI (Southern tick-associated rash illness) is transmitted via bites from the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found in the southeastern and eastern U.S.

●Tickborne relapsing fever (TBRF) is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected soft ticks. TBRF has been reported in 15 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming and is associated with sleeping in rustic cabins and vacation homes.

●Tularemia is transmitted to humans by the dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum364D rickettsiosis (Rickettsia phillipi, proposed) is transmitted to humans by the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis ticks). This is a new disease that has been found in California.

For full hyperlinks for each disease go to the CDC website:
https://www.cdc.go...iseases/index.html

[last edit 8/29/2017 9:22 PM by blackhawk - edited 1 times]

Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 26 on 5/30/2019 3:29 PM >

Tis the season...
https://www.foxnew...tling-tick-warning

Be safe and do a complete tick search & destroy mission after the mission every night.
It may seem like a lot of trouble but these diseases are severe, potentially life altering or fatal even when properly treated.


Reply with Quote


post by Mr. Bitey   |  | 
Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 27 on 5/30/2019 4:23 PM >

I live in the heart of tick country. 3 weeks ago, after a weekend of hiking and camping, 10 deer ticks and 1 wood tick were counting between my girlfriend and the dog. I had none. It was in the car on the way from trail back to camp. Dog must have walked through them all just before we hopped in the car, then sat on her lap. Fortunately, they were all crawling, none embedded. This last weekend, I found a deer tick deeply embedded in my side, just above my waist. Nothing is fool proof with these guys, some just plain don't seem to care about the bug spray.

Tall grasses are a favorite home of theirs. WI DNR says to tuck you pant legs into your socks, vs tucking pants into your shoes. With the really wet spring up here, and most everywhere else, ticks will be BAD this year (in WI they already are bad - really BAD). Do all you can to prevent them from ever embedding. Hats, tucked shirt, tucked pants into long socks, bug spray with at least 40% Deet. Check yourself as often as possible, don't forget to run your fingertips on your scalp, nasty cracks/crevices, and your belly button if you are "innie" equipped!

Think about them until your skin crawls - that skin crawl keep you conscience of the risk!


Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 28 on 5/30/2019 4:46 PM >

Posted by Mr. Bitey
I live in the heart of tick country. 3 weeks ago, after a weekend of hiking and camping, 10 deer ticks and 1 wood tick were counting between my girlfriend and the dog. I had none. It was in the car on the way from trail back to camp. Dog must have walked through them all just before we hopped in the car, then sat on her lap. Fortunately, they were all crawling, none embedded. This last weekend, I found a deer tick deeply embedded in my side, just above my waist. Nothing is fool proof with these guys, some just plain don't seem to care about the bug spray.

Tall grasses are a favorite home of theirs. WI DNR says to tuck you pant legs into your socks, vs tucking pants into your shoes. With the really wet spring up here, and most everywhere else, ticks will be BAD this year (in WI they already are bad - really BAD). Do all you can to prevent them from ever embedding. Hats, tucked shirt, tucked pants into long socks, bug spray with at least 40% Deet. Check yourself as often as possible, don't forget to run your fingertips on your scalp, nasty cracks/crevices, and your belly button if you are "innie" equipped!

Think about them until your skin crawls - that skin crawl keep you conscience of the risk!


Meh, I hate them. Very few or none in the desert.
Only ones I've seen here have been on dogs in town.

High top boots with pants tucked in. You can add cloth tape to that as well to seal the boots to pants.
Put the bug spray around the top of the boots.
Best to avoid heavily infested areas/trails. Take frequent looks to know when it's getting thick.
A bush hat helps. Avoid making contact with all vegetation as much as possible.

Remember to bag the clothes afterward.
20 minutes of medium to high heat in the dryer kills them.



Reply with Quote


post by Abby Normal   |  | 
Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 29 on 5/30/2019 10:34 PM >

Posted by blackhawk


Meh, I hate them. Very few or none in the desert.

<snip>



I was surprised one day to find one crawling up my pant leg after climbing up to a local mine. There was a bit of under-brush and some desert weed growth that we passed through.



So even in desert it pays to take a quick look for the little bastards. Of course in the higher desert areas where you start to get more plant life, all the precautions should be followed.

Abby Normal



Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 30 on 5/30/2019 11:02 PM >

Posted by Abby Normal


I was surprised one day to find one crawling up my pant leg after climbing up to a local mine. There was a bit of under-brush and some desert weed growth that we passed through.

http://www.mine-ex...t/Accident_076.jpg

So even in desert it pays to take a quick look for the little bastards. Of course in the higher desert areas where you start to get more plant life, all the precautions should be followed.

Abby Normal



No clue why that is.
I've hike the deserts around here extensively on and off for 9 years, spring/summer/fall... not one.
Walked through more miles of thick scrub brush here than I care to think about.
Stopped looking for them years ago.

Update:
Ward County (2000 to 2016) - 0 cases of Lyme reported
https://www.tickch...s/ward-county/lyme

Ector County (2000 to 2016) - 3 confirmed, 30 estimated
https://www.tickch.../ector-county/lyme

I hike primarily in deserts in Ward county.
Rabies is essentially nonexistent here as well.

Know if you are in or going into a high risk area. Take more precautions if so.
Goggle the county to get the stats.

At home;
If two or more of your neighbors or their pets have contracted it, the risk is much higher.





[last edit 5/31/2019 4:52 AM by blackhawk - edited 2 times]

Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 31 on 6/5/2019 2:08 AM >

RMSF is a medical emergency. Delay in treatment can result in death.
Any time you have a fever, headache and particularly a skin rash you need to see a doctor ASAP.
Lyme isn't as serious or urgent but it's staging progression can turn unpredictable once the fever is present.

https://www.foxnew...tain-spotted-fever


Reply with Quote


post by wttnparanormal   |  | 
Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 32 on 6/7/2019 4:12 PM >

I'd suggest Repel Tick Defense as a preventative measure. We use it all the time, and never get ticks (or mosquito bites) when wearing it.

https://www.google...481147593299293236

[last edit 6/7/2019 4:12 PM by wttnparanormal - edited 1 times]

Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 33 on 6/24/2019 4:32 PM >

Wow, ticks are wicked nasty critters.
Toxic saliva? Check.
Mostly happens to children under 10 and pets.
Bottom line, attached ticks can be a killer.
The Australian Paralysis Tick is even worse.

https://en.m.wikip...iki/Tick_paralysis

Trix are for kids...

https://www.foxnew...are-tick-paralysis




Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 34 on 6/29/2019 8:09 PM >

Red meat lovers greatest enemy has been spotted in northern Wisconsin.
https://www.foxnew...n-red-meat-allergy

I hate ticks...


Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 35 on 7/17/2019 3:08 PM >

A deer tick attached to eyeball. Damn.
https://www.foxnew...s-eyeball-kentucky


Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 36 on 7/30/2019 6:15 PM >

I almost posted this on my Dumb Bunny thread.
https://www.foxnew...-disease-tick-rash

Multiple bulls eyes wow.
You see this, it's classic Lyme disease!
Note: the margins will continue to spread outward and will eventually disappear even if not treated.





Reply with Quote


post by Mr. Bitey   |  | 
Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 37 on 7/30/2019 6:29 PM >

Posted by blackhawk

Multiple bulls eyes wow.



Damn - looks like an octopus attack!


Reply with Quote


post by blackhawk   |  | This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.

Re: Tick Sick 101
<Reply # 38 on 7/30/2019 6:33 PM >

Posted by Mr. Bitey


Damn - looks like an octopus attack!


Looks like a month of doxycycline to me...


Reply with Quote



Reply
< (1)[2]


This thread is in a public category, and can't be made private.



78 ms gen time