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Infiltration Forums > Rookie Forum > A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals(Viewed 1189 times)
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najanaja location:
Minneapolis
 
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A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
< on 1/27/2020 1:47 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Hi all!

As a new UER member, I’d been surfing the Rookie Forums and came across the post of http://www.uer.ca/...=1&threadid=129939 As someone who is in college for a degree with wildlife specialization hoping for a career in herpetology and in greater zoology, I thought I could clear some things up.

FEEL FREE TO ASK ME QUESTIONS

Venomous Snakes

My specialty. Venomous snakes are my passion, and in the future I hope to be working exclusively in this field. There are only a handful of snake species capable of eating humans, and none of them are venomous. The reticulated python and burmese python of Southeast Asia, green anaconda of South America, and the rock python of Africa are probably the only species capable of eating full grown humans (as well as possibly the amethystine python of Australia). However, they are still considered harmless snakes.

Basic Safety Facts:

No venomous snake will go out of its way to hurt you. No species of venomous snakes actively prey on humans, and defensive reactions are often mistaken for aggression. Snakes are defensive creatures. If you stumble across a venomous snake in the midst of exploration, leave it alone and it will likely be on its way.
Most of the common venomous snake species in North America are ambush hunters. Be careful when lifting objects off the ground, or going into tight spaces without looking beforehand. Snakes love cover, and situations like these are where you’re most likely to encounter one.
Any snake with a rattle is venomous.
Know the species in your area well. Don’t rely on commonly repeated myths about triangular heads and slit pupils to decide whether or not the snake in front of you is venomous. Not only do other snakes mimic venomous ones, but if you’re close enough to see the shape of its pupil you’re way too close to an unidentified snake.
If there’s one snake in the building, there’s a strong chance there are more. Snakes flock to good habitat, and abandoned buildings can often be considered just that.
Don’t try to kill snakes. Not only is it dangerous, but killing native wildlife is unjust and immoral. Snakes serve a purpose just as you do, and when you’re exploring things that are derelict and unused, it’s not human habitat anymore.
Wear boots with thick socks. In the event of a snakebite, these could save you from a lengthy hospital stay, as well as a massive bill.


In conclusion: Just leave them alone and chill. I strongly suggest you learn about the venomous snakes in your area, and treat them with compassion.

Further reading: https://blogs.cdc....2019/07/09/snakes/
https://www.pitt.e...cs2/herp/SoNA.html

Spiders and Ticks

The CDC just lists two potentially dangerous spiders on its website, the black widow and the brown recluse. Preventing contact with spiders is like preventing contact with ticks, so I’ve grouped them together. Eliminate spaces of unprotected skin, and hope for the best. Spiders and ticks can both be at home in the habitat that we are exploring, and wearing clothing that protects is really the only way to combat this. Bug spray with deet is also helpful.

Further reading: https://www.cdc.go...iders/default.html
https://www.cdc.gov/ticks/index.html

Rodents

Jesus fuck, I hate these things. Boots are once again a must, as well as a facemask to prevent exposure to stirring up all of their disease-ridden shit and piss. Do what you can not to get bitten, and be careful. I’ve been in some buildings where these disgusting fuckers are everywhere. Hantavirus will be your main concern, as it is airborne. Also, if cornered, RATS WILL FIGHT BACK. As in, they will attack you. Look at the videos of cats getting chased by them, then ask yourself if you want to be in that situation. It’s hard to avoid contact with rodents in our fine hobby, but wear air filters to minimize the risk, and try not to touch them.

Further reading: https://www.cdc.gov/rodents/index.html

Feral Cats, Raccoons, Skunks, Foxes

If you see these, avoid them. All of these species are some of the main vectors of rabies in the United States. Feral cats are fucked up, and can carry a variety of diseases that you do not want within 26890 miles of your home. I’d say that these animals could be the most dangerous to you, as lots of people don’t think of them as a threat. Treat injuries sustained from any of these animals as an emergency situation. You’re most likely to run into cats and raccoons, as some buildings in urban areas can be completely taken over by them. You can also run into them in drains, as well as opossums, if the carcass I saw in one is anything to go by. Avoidance is recommended, and look for signs that the building you’re in is definitely uninhabited.

Further reading: https://www.usatod...bies-risk/2665359/
https://www.cdc.go...baylis_spring.html

Dogs

Same situation as cats. Don’t underestimate them, and you don’t want to be on the wrong end of a bite from a feral dog or a guard dog. If your location holds a feral colony, it’s not really your location. You can get past guard dogs, but I’d only suggest trying if they are controlled by humans. Free roaming dogs are not something I’d mess with.

Bats

I love bats, but there are many situations where they can be a danger to you, as I recently learned. Post-exposure rabies shots are something I cannot recommend. If you make contact with them, it is already an indication that they’re sick. A bat’s echolocation is extremely precise. They shouldn’t fly into anything, and if they do, it is evidence that they are incapacitated in some way that could throw off their amazing senses. For example, a disease that can severely incapacitate any mammal with a brain. Rabies. Therefore, if you get bitten, it is something you should get treated for immediately. Only emergency departments stock the rabies vaccine, so I wouldn’t recommend getting bitten even if you have insurance. Know the signs, and try not to disturb them.

Further reading: https://www.cdc.go.../animals/bats.html

Large wildlife

If you are ever unfortunate enough to find yourself in a situation that puts you in close contact with bears, pumas, moose, or even deer, good luck my friend. Playing dead only works with brown bears, and hasn’t been demonstrated to be effective with black bears. With pumas, there is an oft repeated saying that you shouldn’t run, which is only half true. In cases where it is likely that the puma was performing an act of predation on a human, as in intentionally going for the kill for the purpose of eating you rather than attempting to defend itself, survivability is about the same when you run or if you stand your ground and face it. It isn’t as abnormal for megafauna to take human prey as we’d like to think. If you put a hungry predator in a situation where it thinks there is a good chance for a meal, no matter the species, it will take that chance. However, if you are in a situation where you stumble upon one, or it hasn’t made the decision to attempt to kill you, standing your ground is the best bet that it won’t attack you. The line in these situations is often unclear, but as humans spread out and encroach on the habitat of these predators, we might get more data in the coming years. Moose and deer are dangerous. A deer can severely injure you, no matter how many times you’ve cried while watching Bambi. Deer have been shown to opportunistic carnivore, and will eat meat (rodents, birds) in times when nutrients and calories are scarce. They won’t hunt you, but if you get clubbed by one, they might eat you. There aren’t any cases of deer eating humans confirmed, or suspected, but it’s better to err on the side of caution on this one. Moose, however, are especially dangerous, and can be relentless. Again, they won’t hunt you, but they will defend themselves in a display of aggression more commonly associated with bears. They are beautiful, and generally herbivores, but they can still eviscerate you. Advice: Don’t get too close.

Further reading: https://www.ucdavi...-lion-stand-or-run
https://www.nps.go...s/bears/safety.htm
https://www.vox.co...-deer-sharks-bears
http://www.adfg.al...th.aggressivemoose




I don't like autocracies unless I'm at the helm
Explorer Zero   |  |  | 
Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 1 on 1/27/2020 3:27 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
You left out steers.

My neighbor has a little 800lb steer that runs loose, he damaged my truck and destroyed an outdoor table. I cant shoot him so next time I saw him blocking my driveway and refusing to move I did something dumb, in retrospect.

I got out of the truck and approached him. As he lowered his head I got the sick feeling I was going to get stampeded. I used to ride rodeo and I knew that look in his eyes. So I just looked right back and kicked him on the end of the nose as hard as I could. He spun around and started bucking and bellowing and my pucker factor went way down. I hope he learned his lesson somebody oughta make some ribeye steaks out of this damn bovine.

I guess if somebody cut my nuts off Id be belligerent too but at least now he knows Im no pushover.



adorb location:
Finland
 
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Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 2 on 1/27/2020 1:10 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Thank you for the useful and in-depth post. I must admit I did not know about deer attacking people, but I've definitely seen some aggressive moose.

Also, unless I'm completely mistaken, it's quite rare to find an opossum with rabies and they'd much rather hiss at you and try to look scary. Just don't corner them.



najanaja location:
Minneapolis
 
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Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 3 on 1/28/2020 2:54 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
You are correct! Opossums are also very reluctant to bite, and some handlers have put their (gloved) hands in a hissing opossum's mouth without being bitten. I wouldn't try that though. I felt obligated to add them as they can make drains their homes, and any species of animal will fight back under enough duress.





I don't like autocracies unless I'm at the helm
najanaja location:
Minneapolis
 
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Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 4 on 1/28/2020 2:57 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
I totally forgot about farm animals. I guess larger ones could fall under the large wildlife category in terms of don't fuck with them.





I don't like autocracies unless I'm at the helm
OpenHouse location:
Occupied Land (Treaty 14)
 
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Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 5 on 1/29/2020 2:49 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
This was fun to read... as much as I understand your points, this makes me want to run up to all these animals to admire their badassness.




Howdy <|;}
blackhawk
This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.
 
location:
Mission Control
 
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Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 6 on 1/29/2020 3:17 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by najanaja
You are correct! Opossums are also very reluctant to bite, and some handlers have put their (gloved) hands in a hissing opossum's mouth without being bitten. I wouldn't try that though. I felt obligated to add them as they can make drains their homes, and any species of animal will fight back under enough duress.




You ever look in their mouth?!
Green stained teeth and they reek like they already are dead.
I like my possums at an arm's length... maybe 2 or 3.

Scary (sort of) domestic farm animals?
Long horns especially young ones.
If you've ever seen them jumping around you get the idea not to get too close real fast.



Just when I thought I was out... they pulled me back in.
najanaja location:
Minneapolis
 
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Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 7 on 1/29/2020 8:32 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by OpenHouse
This was fun to read... as much as I understand your points, this makes me want to run up to all these animals to admire their badassness.



Me too, man. Me too.



I don't like autocracies unless I'm at the helm
najanaja location:
Minneapolis
 
 |  | 
Re: A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals
<Reply # 8 on 1/29/2020 8:38 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by blackhawk


You ever look in their mouth?!
Green stained teeth and they reek like they already are dead.
I like my possums at an arm's length... maybe 2 or 3.

Scary (sort of) domestic farm animals?
Long horns especially young ones.
If you've ever seen them jumping around you get the idea not to get too close real fast.


I had scary experience with an opossum. I was walking to a grocery store alone at night while listening to music when I heard noises behind me. Out came the earbuds, and I turned around to see what looked like a mega-rat crossing the street. Funny afterwards, not so much in the moment.

I haven't done any in-depth research on domestic farm animals, but generally I'd treat a bull or horse like I'd treat a moose. Admire it from a distance.



I don't like autocracies unless I'm at the helm
Infiltration Forums > Rookie Forum > A Future Zoologist's Advice on Animals(Viewed 1189 times)
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