forums
new posts
donate
UER Store
events
location db
db map
search
members
faq
terms of service
privacy policy
register
login




UER Forum > UE Main > Tips for requesting permission (Viewed 3005 times)
twinpowered 


Location: BC, Canada
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes


Every photo tells a story.

 |  |  | twinpowered
Tips for requesting permission
< on 10/6/2015 3:36 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
So there are a number of very old, very nice looking buildings downtown here. I've been watching them for some time now, but I have still yet to find a POE and construction has begun to (likely demo) and construct condos. No surprise there. I think if there's any chance for me to see the interiors of these places, I will likely need to be granted access by the property owners.
For you explorers who have had success (and the ones who haven't) - do you have any tips on going about this? I.e. Who to contact for property owner info, how to phrase your request... things like this. I've only really done UE the old fashioned 'let yourself in' way, so I've never thought much how how one would ask permission to enter private property.




Leopard18 


Location: Boston, MA
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 52 likes




 |  | 
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 1 on 10/6/2015 4:02 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
As always, success is not a guarantee. I am in the process of trying to arrange a string of legal explores myself. Networking is everything, ask around within your friends, you'd be surprised who has connections to what. If you have any friends that are city officials, see if they can check on ownership and get you email addresses and phone numbers. I have had success with asking a friend/member of the fire department, emailing journalists who wrote articles, and hours of research looking for details that could lead to one of such sources.

The letter to the actual owner is a lot harder. If you're young enough, stories about college projects and research work. Generally it's best if you can find a mutual friend with someone who manages the site, cause then you have someone to vouch for you, but that can be really hard. Check if any of your friends are involved with construction and what they know. If all else fails, I find that (minus cameras and motion detectors) companies get careless about locking up and it makes it easier to get in. hope that helps.




Turd Furgusen 


Location: Charleston, WV
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 327 likes


I think marijuana is just nature's way of saying high!

 |  |  | AIM Message | Weston State Hospital
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 2 on 10/6/2015 5:40 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
You should always make sure you offer to present them with a signed and notarized letter absolving the owner of any liability to yourself while on the site.




Everyone has a dark side, mines just a little more illuminated.
EsseXploreR 


Location: New Jersey
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 1117 likes




 |  |  | AbandonedNJ Photography
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 3 on 10/6/2015 5:54 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Permission is tough, but for what it's worth, most places are easiest when demolition is about to happen. The crews going in and clearing out hazardous materials will usually always leave places wide open. That's just been my experience locally though. Not sure how that goes in other parts of the world.




https://www.flickr...62837453@N07/sets/

http://www.tfpnj.blogspot.com
DJ Craig 

Moderator


Location: Johnson City, TN
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 367 likes


Break the Silence

 |  |  | AIM Message | Facebook
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 4 on 10/7/2015 12:54 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum




"You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go..." -Dr. Suess
DundahMifflin 


Location: Philadelphia
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 14 likes




 |  | 
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 5 on 10/7/2015 5:55 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
I used to be infatuated with this hospital that was being torn down in 2013. I was still brand new to the city at the time, so I knew no one and tried exploring it on my own. It always failed, and before I knew it, 90% of it was torn down. I ended up getting in contact with the head of the construction company in charge of the demolition and talked my way into them agreeing to let me come out and essentially be given a tour.

I told them I was a photography student (not too far off from the truth!) and they were basically like, "WELL COME ON IN, THEN!" The guy in charge of showing me around ended up even taking me to the half-demolished roof and showed me a bunch of neat demolition stuff.

If you're younger and could pass as a college student, use that to your advantage. I wasn't even a registered student when I told them I was one, and they never once cared to check or verify. As long as you present yourself in a nice and 'innocent' manner, your chances of being told yes are much higher than acting like you know all about abandoned buildings.




terapr0 


Location: Sauga City
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 336 likes


www . tohellandback . net

 |  |  | To Hell And Back
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 6 on 10/7/2015 3:13 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Over the years I've been given permission to shoot all kinds of stuff - everything from highrise tower cranes to tunneling projects, to automotive plants and power stations. In every single instance it came down to leveraging an existing relationship or having someone you know leverage one on your behalf.

Do you have any friends from highschool who've become civil engineers or architects? Do you know anyone in marketing or advertising for a construction developer? Do you know anyone who works as a construction foreman? Do you know anyone who works in the film or TV industry? If you don't, maybe your friends do. Maybe your parents do. Ask around and you'll be probably be surprised how many people are happy to help arrange access to all kinds of interesting places.
Just this past weekend I got permission to shoot inside of the Hearn generating station through a friend of the girlfriend of the son of the president of the movie studio who holds the lease. As with almost all things in life - success has more to do with who you know than what you know.

...and if all else fails, just UER the shit out of that piece ;D



[last edit 10/7/2015 5:08 PM by terapr0 - edited 1 times]

www.tohellandback.net
twinpowered 


Location: BC, Canada
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes


Every photo tells a story.

 |  |  | twinpowered
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 7 on 10/7/2015 4:48 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Thanks for the responses everyone. I'm in the process of tracking down property owners and construction companies.

Do you have any friends from highschool who've become civil engineers or architects?

I'm only 20, so highschool friends are generally in school or working at McDonald's... Fortunately, this works great for the 'I'm a photography student' route.

Maybe your parents do

As it turns out, the current mayor was a teacher at one of my Dad's school! Not the most direct connection to the properties, but hopefully it will be of aid!

I got permission to shoot inside of the Hearn generating station through a friend of the girlfriend of the son of the president of the movie studio who holds the lease.

Studios of America! That's fucking crazy terapr0! How are things there? My last visit was the Unsound/Luminato event. I meant to pay a 'private' visit before I left Toronto, but never got around to it...




Peptic Ulcer 


Location: Katy, TX
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 835 likes


"Isn't it fun - being bad?"

 |  |  | Flickr
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 8 on 10/7/2015 6:16 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Social engineering works well especially if you know your audience. I recently posed as an architect to get into a city hall that was being renovated. I've found that directly asking for permission to go in to take pictures only works about 1/3 of the time.

What I have found that DOES work is to have a good story. Depending on the location it can be anything. My dad used to work here and hes passed away but used to talk about it all the time. My parents got married here etc.

It helps if you can do some research 1st on the place so you can follow along in the conversation when the inevitable questions start coming your way. A lot of this involves you being polite, personable and believable. You have to be able to look a person in the eye and lie your ass off.

Even with that being said its not easy. Most property owners don't want the liability of people inside a dangerous structure and often times (if the site is well known) they have turned down others already. Its best not to argue. Be empathetic and tell them you understand their concerns. You may be able to overcome their objections by asking leading questions like, "So I guess you've had some folks hurt in there before".

Another concern is privacy. These guys dont want to publicize the fact that the place is unoccupied for obvious reasons. As above its important to be empathetic and explain your respect and reverence for these sites. Tell them that because of this you dont publish the photos with any names other than something generic like "West Texas Farmhouse" or something similar.

The good news is that most of the times even if you are denied permission you can get a lot of info out of people about the history of the place and previous POI's. Asking questions and playing dumb works (trust me its what I do every day in sales).

The bad news is that if you are denied permission for entry it can be construed as you having been warned not to trespass which can up the crime from 3rd degree to 1st degree (at least in Texas).

If they work, permitted explores can be great especially if you the owner comes with you. You get a ton of information about the place that would take you hours and you may even learn something that otherwise wouldnt turn up in normal research. The key is to be polite and believable.

Good luck and happy exploring!




See More on Flickr!
https://www.flickr...tos/133983270@N06/
Peptic Ulcer 


Location: Katy, TX
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 835 likes


"Isn't it fun - being bad?"

 |  |  | Flickr
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 9 on 10/7/2015 8:11 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Since my last post I've been thinking about this more and more (or obsessing - take your pick). The idea occurred to me that posing as a journalist is probably your best bet bet at social engineering. Most of the people I have met who own these places have money and a big ego. Posing as an independent journalist from UEM (Urban Exploration Magazine) could get you in the door. Technically its true because they've called for submissions from UER's and you ARE an independent contractor.

If the person decides to look it up they'll find a legit site devoted to urban exploration and old sites. Print up some business cards with the name of some photographic company (Peptic's Professional Photos!) with a bullshit PO box for the address.

When you make your initial call it should go something like this:

"Hello Mr. Whatshisnuts my name is Peptic Ulcer with Peptic's Professional Photos. I'm an independent contractor with Urban Exploration Magazine and would like to set up an interview to discuss The Milford Dildo Factory. When would be a good time next week to come by?"

Questions may ensue but keep it brief, to the point and on topic.

Tell him that you will want to discuss the history of the building, how they acquired it, its current state and what future plans they may have. DO NOT ASK TO VISIT OR TAKE PICTURES (See below)

Make sure he is given a chance to bring up any information he may want to know (this puts him at ease and lets you be prepared in case you get there and he starts asking questions you arent ready for).

Summarize the meeting by going over everything once again, repeating what you want, what he wants and the time, date and place.

Once you're there have at least a dozen questions ready (this is especially easy if you have done some research). Keep him talking - the last thing you want is for him to start asking YOU questions. Keep this about him - you're ego gets satisfied when you get an explore.

Things like, "Wow thats great! Tell me more about that!" or "Can you elaborate on that a bit more?". This should work well if they complain about "those pesky kids and their meddling dog!".

When its all over, tell him you think you have every thing you need then ask him if you guys can head over to take some pictures of the place. At this point he should be emotionally invested and more willing to allow access. If he says no look confused and disappointed and tell him that you need pictures for the story or they wont print it.

None of this is a sure thing as I just thought about it, but I can say that when I have done similar things in sales it works like a charm. The key it would seem is to be prepared, act confident and know your shit. Remember stroking his ego gets you want you want. It may feel slimy but you're gonna need a shower after the explore anyway!




See More on Flickr!
https://www.flickr...tos/133983270@N06/
Leopard18 


Location: Boston, MA
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 52 likes




 |  | 
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 10 on 10/7/2015 9:35 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by Peptic Ulcer

When you make your initial call it should go something like this:

"Hello Mr. Whatshisnuts my name is Peptic Ulcer with Peptic's Professional Photos. I'm an independent contractor with Urban Exploration Magazine and would like to set up an interview to discuss The Milford Dildo Factory."


There is so much wrong with this paragraph.

+1




twinpowered 


Location: BC, Canada
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes


Every photo tells a story.

 |  |  | twinpowered
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 11 on 10/8/2015 3:11 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
your initial call


I suppose a phonecall would be more effective for this, in order to deploy expression/intonation/ect? I just got emails for two property managers, perhaps it would be a good idea to go back and ask for a phone number? I appreciate the input, Ulcer. None of this is a sure thing, but it certainly helps to keep in mind. I would not say that simply asking to take photos is a sure thing either.




WhiskeyPapa 


Gender: Male
Total Likes: 61 likes




 |  | 
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 12 on 10/9/2015 12:26 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by Peptic Ulcer
I'm an independent contractor with Urban Exploration Magazine and would like to set up an interview to discuss The Milford Dildo Factory.


I know this is frowned upon but I have to ask....where is the dildo factory? I'm pretty sure I need to go.




Eagle_Crow 


Location: Anywhere I wanna be
Gender: Female
Total Likes: 42 likes




 |  |  | CraZeePaint
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 13 on 10/9/2015 6:01 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
I tried once at a place in Quebec...I figured since I could speak French the guy would be more appreciative and responsive to the request.

He just thought I was a total loon and who would want to go in a crappy old house, called me nuts then he chased me off his land.

I rarely ask.




twinpowered 


Location: BC, Canada
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes


Every photo tells a story.

 |  |  | twinpowered
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 14 on 10/10/2015 6:06 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by WhiskeyPapa

I know this is frowned upon but I have to ask....where is the dildo factory? I'm pretty sure I need to go.


In Milford, of course. You can't miss it. It's the giant phallus-shaped structure that can be seen from Sammy's Sex Shop on (broken) Water St.


Post by Eagle_Crow
I tried once at a place in Quebec...I figured since I could speak French the guy would be more appreciative and responsive to the request.

He just thought I was a total loon and who would want to go in a crappy old house, called me nuts then he chased me off his land.

I rarely ask.


Haha that's unfortunate. Some people just don't understand us freaks..... Not a clue why!




blackhawk 

This member has been banned. See the banlist for more information.


Location: Mission Control
Total Likes: 3950 likes


UER newbie

 |  |  | 
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 15 on 10/12/2015 7:31 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Been there and done it. Never lie when the truth would serve you better.
You need to speak with the site supervisor. Tell them you are interested in shooting the building. It helps to know it's history and show genuine interest in it. Offer to share pics with them.

Bring your gear and a hard hat. Steel toe boots if you have them. He may say you can only shoot a few shots under supervision. If so grab it and make a good impression. He may invite you back to shoot more with greater freedom. I shot 3 demo projects plus like that.
Carrying a pro body cam with a fat L lense on it helps. If you look like a pro shooter people tend to believe you are. Don't shoot anything they tell you not to, or that could harm or be a liability to them.

Being able to shoot without looking over your shoulder and having to stay low is the best. Makes it worth the effort. Otherwise, it they are off Sunday, pre-dawn it and don't get tagged. Good Luck.




Just when I thought I was out... they pulled me back in.
Explorer Zero 


Total Likes: 2016 likes




 |  |  | 
Re: Tips for requesting permission
< Reply # 16 on 10/12/2015 7:52 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by blackhawk
Never lie when the truth would serve you better.


quoted for truth, no pun intended...




UER Forum > UE Main > Tips for requesting permission (Viewed 3005 times)


Add a poll to this thread



This thread is in a public category, and can't be made private.



All content and images copyright 2002-2022 UER.CA and respective creators. Graphical Design by Crossfire.
To contact webmaster, or click to email with problems or other questions about this site: UER CONTACT
View Terms of Service | View Privacy Policy | Server colocation provided by Beanfield
This page was generated for you in 140 milliseconds. Since June 23, 2002, a total of 679724040 pages have been generated.