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UER Forum > Archived US: Mid-Atlantic > Maryland Nike Launch Site (Viewed 8574 times)
blackhawk 

Not an expert.


Location: Mission Control


^>^The Right Honourable^<^ >>>UER newbie<<<

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Re: Maryland Nike Launch Site
<Reply # 40 on 12/16/2006 5:58 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by /-/ooligan


Well, we totally disagree that shock mounts were an attempt to survive a direct hit. Shock mounts aren't going to help out too much if the entire structure is incinerated, or the roof collapses, or the overpressure causes the site to implode.

There's a decent amount od old AT&T/Bell Labs/Western Electric literature from the 1950s - 1970s out there which discusses the protection factors for various telco sites that have critical government comm circuits passing thru them. Albert LaFrance has assembled many on his web page. I seem to recall 100psi overpressure being the max. blast protection factor for most of them, and 100psi is impressive (pun intended) but I think it's a wee-bit below what would have been expected at ground zero of a nuclear blast.


I've been all thru the FEMA bunker in Olney, MD & it had the double set of blast doors, pop-up antennas, floor & ceiling-mounted shock isolators, etc. plus I've been in a Titan & a couple Minuteman launch control centers that had all that stuff, and they had no confusion that the site wouldn't survive a direct hit.


You have to remember the Soviet missile weren't and back then weren't considered to be accurate within (?) miles. The Topol-M in 1997 is reputed to be accurate within 500 meters with a maximum deviation of 800 meters. In 1967 the Soviets couldn't have score a direct hit if Moscow depended on it. The US counterparts were said to be considerable more accurate.

Had the Soviets taken out those harden structures by then it wouldn't have mattered as Russia would have been annihilated at that point, and perhaps so would we. Call me mad, but I like the idea of at least two Trident subs out there...waiting.

Fun missile links:
http://www.thebull...n=ma04kristensen#1
http://www.freeweb...clearusa/index.htm






[last edit 12/16/2006 5:58 AM by blackhawk - edited 1 times]

Just when I thought I was out... they pulled me back in.
/-/ooligan 


Location: Las Vegas area
Gender: Male


When in danger, when in doubt, RUN IN CIRCLES, SCREAM AND SHOUT!

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Re: Maryland Nike Launch Site
<Reply # 41 on 12/17/2006 3:39 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by blackhawk


You have to remember the Soviet missile weren't and back then weren't considered to be accurate within (?) miles. The Topol-M in 1997 is reputed to be accurate within 500 meters with a maximum deviation of 800 meters. In 1967 the Soviets couldn't have score a direct hit if Moscow depended on it. The US counterparts were said to be considerable more accurate.

Had the Soviets taken out those harden structures by then it wouldn't have mattered as Russia would have been annihilated at that point, and perhaps so would we. Call me mad, but I like the idea of at least two Trident subs out there...waiting.

Fun missile links:
http://www.thebull...n=ma04kristensen#1
http://www.freeweb...clearusa/index.htm




Your response is quite confusing. I'm the one that remembers that Soviet/Russian nuclear warhead circular error probables were pretty large, thus, I pointed out that structures were designed to try to survive a near miss during most of the Cold War in an earlier response here.

You are the one claiming that pop-up antennas, blast doors, & shock-mounted equipment racks were indications that a site was designed to survive a direct hit, and now you suddenly bring up CEPs. WTF???




There are no stupid questions, just stupid people.
blackhawk 

Not an expert.


Location: Mission Control


^>^The Right Honourable^<^ >>>UER newbie<<<

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Re: Maryland Nike Launch Site
<Reply # 42 on 12/17/2006 3:51 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Posted by /-/ooligan


Your response is quite confusing. I'm the one that remembers that Soviet/Russian nuclear warhead circular error probables were pretty large, thus, I pointed out that structures were designed to try to survive a near miss during most of the Cold War in an earlier response here.

You are the one claiming that pop-up antennas, blast doors, & shock-mounted equipment racks were indications that a site was designed to survive a direct hit, and now you suddenly bring up CEPs. WTF???





Direct hit with what? How many? The list of possible scenarios is endless. As best I can tell, a lot of the info is still classified such as accurately. Some where more than just slightly harden though and would survive airbursts, an on the money direct ground hit? Doubtful.

Just when I thought I was out... they pulled me back in.
Dallas1 






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Re: Maryland Nike Launch Site
<Reply # 43 on 1/2/2007 6:15 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
Hey, I grew up playing in this place. Anytime you would like to go see the other 2 silos let me know. I know the first silo you come too when you enter the facility still had power 15 years ago when I moved away. The Baltimore County Fire department had an obstacle course in it for firefighters to navigate in all of their turn out gear. The second and third silos never had anything interesting in them that I can remember. I would love to go back out there sometime though.

Newt 






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Re: Maryland Nike Launch Site
<Reply # 44 on 3/25/2007 6:41 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
 
I cannot view the pictures that you have posted. I only see a small white box with an x inside. When I right click on the x and select download pictures, nothing happens. How can I veiw your pictures?

Posted by SpookyDan
My write-up & pics
____________________________
http://www.extreme...oration/nike01.jpg

The Place:

NIKE Missile Launch Site

Also known as:
"BA-09"

Location:
Fork, MD

Visited:
Yes

Current Owner:
John Mace
Fork, MD

Background:
The Nike named after the Greek goddess of victory, was the name given to a program that produced the worlds first successful guided surface-to-air missiles. During the start of the cold war the United States built Nike missile sites around populated areas due to the threat of a new wave of soviet long range bomber aircraft which were capable of carrying bombs well withing the continental US.

This Launch Control Area (LCA) site consits of about 10 acres. On site is a guardhouse, former barracks, water tanks, pump house, an acid-neutralization pit, three missile silos, three monitoring wells, and numerous trailers, autos and other misc junk.

In 1954, the United States Government obtained the land for the Fork Nike Launch site from Marie DeVault. The site formerly contained the equipment required to assemble, test, and maintain missiles and associated launchers. According to Mr. Mace, in 1962, the site was deactivated because it was unsuitable for the Hercules missile system that began deployment that year. Between 1962 and 1985, the site was inactive, and the property was still owned by the Federal Government. In 1985, John Mace purchased the property from the Federal Government for $65,000. For a short time in 1986, the property was leased to the Baltimore County Police Department. Since then, the property has been used by Mr. Mace for breeding horses and goats.

Status:
This site is on the State Master List that identifies potential hazardous waste sites in Maryland. Because of that it can't be used for much of anything and sits over-grown and piled with junk. The site barely resembles the military facility it used to be. The watch towers are gone and the access doors to the silos have been welded shut. Other access points have been locked via pad-locks.


Photos:

Some buildings... Overgrown and full of the owners junk.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike02.jpg

A view looking down the row of silos.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike03.jpg

A silo door.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike04.jpg

Another silo door.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike05.jpg

A little spooky at first glance this hatch and ladder climb was our way in.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike06.jpg

A shower station inside one of the silos.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike07.jpg

Pumps... Maybe fire system or missile lift hydrolics.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike08.jpg

A view of the missile lift and silo doors from below.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike09.jpg

I suppose when in use the missle lift would have sat in this hole making the missile itself accessible at floor level.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike10.jpg

A double set of blast proof doors. This thick steel doors led back to a room which was empty.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike11.jpg

The main entrance... was welded shut on the out side.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike12.jpg

Ventilation on ground level.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike13.jpg

Some type of crane/lift back in the woods off the main launch pad.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike14.jpg

Another shower startion. These things were all over the place.
http://www.extreme...oration/nike15.jpg




UER Forum > Archived US: Mid-Atlantic > Maryland Nike Launch Site (Viewed 8574 times)
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