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Infiltration Forums > UE Photo Critiques > My First Attempt at Editing(Viewed 622 times)
Cfourexplore location:
North Carolina
 
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My First Attempt at Editing
< on 6/18/2019 1:04 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Hey everybody, this is my first time contributing to the critiques forum...and my first time in attempting to edit my pics. Recently I did an explore with another UER member (Oysterhead) and while many of my shots came out pretty well, I was disappointed at how dark the auditorium pics came out.
I am using a Canon SX-100, a rather outdated camera (bought in 2007) but one that has served me well over the years. I've used the basic photoshop editor (Windows 10) to bump up the light, coloring, and clarity in the pics, and present to you the before and after.
I'm generally content with my amateurish photography skills, but it never hurts to try improving when I can, so I welcome any tips, critiques, or comments anyone may have.
Thanks for looking, and for any help or comments you wish to share!

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"When you've truly done something right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all."
Beebs   |  | 
Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 1 on 6/18/2019 3:12 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Good ole crank the shadows and lower the highlights will do the trick.



jc0507 location:
Long Island, NY
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 2 on 6/18/2019 9:15 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
A good camera can really make the picture, and I think you're in need of a new one. Early digital cameras aren't exactly the best. I think you did a great job with your resources though!!! Editing looks fine to me.



ryanpics location:
Central Va
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 3 on 6/19/2019 4:35 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
The edits definitely make the pictures look better. There's only so much you can do with a dark jpg, especially when it has grain to begin with. Shooting on such an old camera is a big drawback for quick shooting like it seems like you do. If you don't want to carry around a tripod and do a longer exposure for every shot then a newer camera might be nice.
I think that you're pictures show the places extremely well, so if you're content with that then that's great. In general, a newer camera would make the pictures a little bit cleaner and maybe give you more flexibility with a wider lens, but it's not at all necessary if you don't think it is.



Cfourexplore location:
North Carolina
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 4 on 6/19/2019 12:18 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by jc0507
A good camera can really make the picture, and I think you're in need of a new one. Early digital cameras aren't exactly the best. I think you did a great job with your resources though!!! Editing looks fine to me.



Post by ryanpics
The edits definitely make the pictures look better. There's only so much you can do with a dark jpg, especially when it has grain to begin with. Shooting on such an old camera is a big drawback for quick shooting like it seems like you do. If you don't want to carry around a tripod and do a longer exposure for every shot then a newer camera might be nice.
I think that you're pictures show the places extremely well, so if you're content with that then that's great. In general, a newer camera would make the pictures a little bit cleaner and maybe give you more flexibility with a wider lens, but it's not at all necessary if you don't think it is.


Thank you for the input, I very much appreciate it! It's nice to get a perspective other than mine own; good to know I didn't make it much worse, at least.😉 I'd thought the 'afters' came out well, it's good to hear it confirmed.
I've begun using a tripod lately, usually as a weight, though, and it's definitely improved my photo quality, but oftentimes I tend to quick shoot anyway, instead of taking my time like I should (I'm working on it though).
I've been considering a new camera for awhile; even though I'm usually pretty satisfied with my shots, I often end up somewhere where having a wider lens or more control of my settings would really make that awesome shot. (Might even encourage me to hone my skills, rather than being lazy and going for the quick shoot 😏).
Thanks again, you all have helped quite a bit! 😀




"When you've truly done something right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all."
Dan Lee location:
N. Illlinois
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 5 on 6/19/2019 7:12 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Even with an older camera you can get some good shots. You said you have a tripod? Do you usually run the camera in Auto or Manual? If your unfamiliar with the manual setting I'd suggest watching some tutorial vids on the functions of the camera and how to use it in Manual mode. Fine tuning it yourself really unlocks the full potential of it and elevates your pictures to the next level. The reason the dark pics are so grainy is because the ISO (sensitivity of the sensor to light) is too high, which usually happens when the camera is in auto, it senses a dark scene and then compensate by jacking up the ISO. The higher you crank up the ISO the more light it receives but the trade off is grain as you can see. To get a good picture you should set up the tripod, put down the ISO to a much lower number, open up the aperture some, and crank the shutter speed down to maybe 10-30 seconds depending on how dark the scene is. The longer the shutter stays open, the more light it lets in, the more light it lets in, the better exposed your picture will be without electronic assistance (ISO). Now to have the shutter speed that slow and still get a decent picture, you'll definitely need to use a tripod. In rooms that are pitch black you can do the same process, but use a flashlight and illuminate the room that way. I hope this made some sort of sense, and if you want me to explain anything further or with more detail, I'd be more than happy to. Image attached is a room that was so dark you couldn't see your hand in front of your face, I had my camera set on ISO-800, Aperture-4.0 and Shutter speed - 15 or 20 seconds I believe. I just used a glow stick to get the light trails. But gives you an example. Also I am an amateur photographer myself, so if anything I said wasn't 100% accurate or if any of the more seasoned photography vets have a different way of doing things, I'd love to hear it.




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Cfourexplore location:
North Carolina
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 6 on 6/19/2019 8:59 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by Dan Lee
Even with an older camera you can get some good shots. You said you have a tripod? Do you usually run the camera in Auto or Manual? If your unfamiliar with the manual setting I'd suggest watching some tutorial vids on the functions of the camera and how to use it in Manual mode. Fine tuning it yourself really unlocks the full potential of it and elevates your pictures to the next level. The reason the dark pics are so grainy is because the ISO (sensitivity of the sensor to light) is too high, which usually happens when the camera is in auto, it senses a dark scene and then compensate by jacking up the ISO. The higher you crank up the ISO the more light it receives but the trade off is grain as you can see. To get a good picture you should set up the tripod, put down the ISO to a much lower number, open up the aperture some, and crank the shutter speed down to maybe 10-30 seconds depending on how dark the scene is. The longer the shutter stays open, the more light it lets in, the more light it lets in, the better exposed your picture will be without electronic assistance (ISO). Now to have the shutter speed that slow and still get a decent picture, you'll definitely need to use a tripod. In rooms that are pitch black you can do the same process, but use a flashlight and illuminate the room that way. I hope this made some sort of sense, and if you want me to explain anything further or with more detail, I'd be more than happy to. Image attached is a room that was so dark you couldn't see your hand in front of your face, I had my camera set on ISO-800, Aperture-4.0 and Shutter speed - 15 or 20 seconds I believe. I just used a glow stick to get the light trails. But gives you an example. Also I am an amateur photographer myself, so if anything I said wasn't 100% accurate or if any of the more seasoned photography vets have a different way of doing things, I'd love to hear it.




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Wow, thank you for this...unfortunately, I tend to mostly rely on my auto settings, but I've messed around a bit with the ISO settings; not so much with the shutter speed.
I'll probably always be a better explorer than photographer (at least til I quit being lazy and just point and click), but before putting some bucks down on a new camera, I think I'll try your suggestions (although it wouldn't hurt to have a wider angle lens).
This is very concise and understandable information, I appreciate your time and advice; I will definitely put it to use and see how it goes. Also, that pic you added is sweet! Love the coloration; good shooting!
Thanks again!



"When you've truly done something right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all."
Dan Lee location:
N. Illlinois
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 7 on 6/20/2019 7:39 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by Cfourexplore


Wow, thank you for this...unfortunately, I tend to mostly rely on my auto settings, but I've messed around a bit with the ISO settings; not so much with the shutter speed.
I'll probably always be a better explorer than photographer (at least til I quit being lazy and just point and click), but before putting some bucks down on a new camera, I think I'll try your suggestions (although it wouldn't hurt to have a wider angle lens).
This is very concise and understandable information, I appreciate your time and advice; I will definitely put it to use and see how it goes. Also, that pic you added is sweet! Love the coloration; good shooting!
Thanks again!


Wide angle lenses are very nice to have. But it sounds like you have a good camera to learn on. Just watch some vids on the exposure triangle and a few other Manual basics and with practice you'll get a feel for it in no time. I look forward to seeing what you shoot in the future



08j23 location:
New York, NY
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 8 on 6/23/2019 8:06 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Id say beware the clipped highlights but there's only so much you can do. As for composition try and make things fall on the rule of thirds lines. that'll add some nice balance to your shot. don't be afraid to make some forced perspective by being close to the chairs or lining up the pathways to the rule of thirds or dead center in the frame. the mind likes symmetry or at least balance.



no god! please no! nooooooooooooo
tiftastic location:
Pittsburgh, PA
 
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Re: My First Attempt at Editing
<Reply # 9 on 6/24/2019 7:39 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Ditto to most of the above - in a setting like this you really only have 2 options for making it work (with natural light) - fast glass and a tripod. I would definitely recommend a longer exposure time (2-3 seconds or more) and a tripod. To reduce the digital noise, try to stay under ISO 500. Lastly, make sure to have your lens as "open" as possible - this means you want to be using the lowest (smallest number/biggest hole) aperture available. This will let as much light in as possible.

Lastly, the best way to get the hang of manual settings is just to try different things! The beauty of shooting digital is that storage is cheap, so you aren't really paying much per shot. Take a notebook with you or come up with a bracket system that you use every time. Ex: Set your camera up on a tripod, put your aperture as low as possible, put your ISO on 500, then take a series of shots at 1 second, 2 seconds, 3 seconds, etc. One of those is bound to be where you want it to be. After a while, you'll be able to walk into a room and know what combination is likely to work best.

Keep up the good work!



Infiltration Forums > UE Photo Critiques > My First Attempt at Editing(Viewed 622 times)
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