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Infiltration Forums > Canada: Alberta / BC > Curriculum vitae(Viewed 19331 times)
Sevtai location:
Greece
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 20 on 4/9/2014 2:26 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by billgeorge
One of my favorite pastimes lately is visiting condo display suites.

Here's me in my downtown camouflage.
http://i43.photobu...y3_zps3f524b81.jpg


Hahaha, I like your style! Awesome pastime. Nice to see something different once in a while.




Denn die Todten reiten schnell.
kowalski   |  | 
Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 21 on 4/9/2014 3:16 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Hey Bill, this is awesome. Keep doing what you're doing, it's been too long since anyone's been willing to write about their enthusiasm for exploring cities this way. This hobby and our cities in general need more people cut from the cloth of Ninjalicious, and I'm very excited to see what you're doing.

Unlike the many false puritans on these forums, I think this is 100% legitimate urban exploration --- indeed, you're doing far more exploration and in a far more urban way than many of the people who confine themselves to abandoned things. Great job.



billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 22 on 4/11/2014 1:45 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Thanks, guys.

I think I'd visit more abandoned buildings, if there were more around. But I live in the city -- and so have to confine myself to the glory of construction sites and the back halls of malls.



billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 23 on 4/11/2014 1:53 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Got up at dawn (fuck!) to check out this under-demolition apartment building.



The huge gaps in the security fence made it irresistible.

I was taking this photo when some unseen person started calling "Hello."



You can just see the security guard's truck's license plate in the darkness.

I guess this guy is of the "wait till they trespass and then pounce on them" school rather than the "make yourself visible to dissuade them from trespassing" school.

We had a pleasant chat. He was a bit puzzled by a "photography student" wearing a hardhat and reflective vest, but told me to come back at 7:30 and talk to the guy in charge about getting permission to take some more photos. I thanked him and agreed, knowing in my heart of hearts that I was going back to bed.





TunnelRunner33 location:
Seattle
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 24 on 4/11/2014 2:02 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Bill,

Great photos and stories! I enjoyed this thread a lot. I especially liked the part about your quick entrance and exit during constructions. The first time I did that, I didn't have a single shot worth keeping, LOL!

Anyways, good stuff and keep it up!




If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find him, maybe you can hire... Tunnelrunner33!
billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 25 on 4/16/2014 7:50 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Did some wandering without my camera this week, and had to fall back on my cell phone.

Got into the parkade of the empty P500 Hotel, but the "Stairwell to Lobby" doors were all locked. This might change next week, when new renovation starts, according to the friendly security guard I spoke to.





Spent an hour or more wandering around the tunnel level, and climbing up into some of the buildings of, the VGeneralH. This place is a freaking wonderland. I think these two photos are from the H. Pavilion, which appeared to be half abandoned:





And then, miracle of miracles, I found a couple of locked but not quite closed doors on the B. Columbia I. of Tech campus.

I poked my nose into every corner of the steam plant ...







... The last corner I poked my nose into was the control room, where I had a brief, awkward chat with the control guy.

"Oh, hi. You, uh, got much to do on a Sunday here?"
"Not really.... You in training or something ...?"
"Nah, just visiting the campus."
"..."
"Well, I guess I'll return my hardhat and, um, get out of here ... Bye."



There are steam tunnels under them thar buildings. Altogether I found and tried about six or seven doors marked "Service Tunnels -- Contractors Must Wear Hardhats," but they were all locked. Even the one in the basement of the steam plant, and the one in the back corner of this normally locked electrical room.



Dang.






thegerm location:
Edmonton
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 26 on 4/17/2014 4:14 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by billgeorge
... The last corner I poked my nose into was the control room, where I had a brief, awkward chat with the control guy.

"Oh, hi. You, uh, got much to do on a Sunday here?"
"Not really.... You in training or something ...?"
"Nah, just visiting the campus."
"..."
"Well, I guess I'll return my hardhat and, um, get out of here ... Bye."


That reminds me of an encounter with workers in a grain terminal. I was lagging behind the group I was with then they started to double back and go another way. The worker was chasing them and when we made eye contact I just shrugged and ran to catch up. He then turned on the alarm and it turned into a big prison escape.



Current addiction: Kijiji
http://www.flickr....otos/thegermphotos
billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 27 on 5/2/2014 9:20 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
There's this big beautiful boat docked in the Fraser River that I've had my hungry eye on for a few weeks.


Not my photo. (Credit suppressed by ninjitsu.)


In fact it's a fishing lodge that makes its way up to Haida Gwaii every summer. At night you can peer from the shore through its large windows into its soft lamplit comfort. It looks like an empty floating hotel. I wanted inside that thing.

I was a bit shy about hopping over the fence into the shipyard at night, since it's well lit and there are always vehicles parked there. I couldn't be sure that there wasn't some kind of night watchperson. Also, though it looked unlikely, it was conceivable that someone might actually live in that floating hotel. It would be not nice to climb aboard someone's house at night.

The eternal debate: Go stealthy by night, and risk appearing so much more guilty if you get caught, or saunter in by day, but be much more likely to be caught or stopped? I wavered, and meanwhile went back several times, by night and by day, to look, and to yearn.

Today, though it was late in the day on a holiday, the gate was open, and I just decided to go straight to the office and ask for permission. The office was locked. I strolled alongside the big boat, trying to look like a photographer mentally composing photos. I strolled up the ramp and right on board. It was wide open, and no one in sight. Christmas!



I was prepared to hail the first person I saw, and grin and say, "Hi there! I was LOOKING for someone to ask permission to take a few photos." But when I reached the large common hall area and still hadn't run into anyone, I decided just to take a few photos.


Blurry panic shot -- with tripod!



Blurry panic shot with tripod.


Aside from a small mechanical room and a small laundry room, I peered into a number of guest rooms. Most of these were stripped down, or cluttered with boxes, or filled with bags of linen. Clearly the lodge was still being prepared for its summer glory. There were also tool belts and coffee cups lying around.


Satellite radio was playing Stevie Nicks.


I went upstairs and looked at more guest rooms, then decided to go downstairs, in search of picturesque engine rooms or, I don't know, steam tunnels. At the bottom of the stairs I looked down one hall, then down the other. I thought I could see a bit of someone's back sitting in a chair, and decided to return upstairs.

I prowled around a little more, took a few more photos, and tried to tell myself NOT to tiptoe -- that was suspicious behavior. (Again the debate: be a stealthy creep, or a noisy innocent?) At the far end of the "main" floor hallway, I stepped out onto the deck, then opened the door to Suite 14, which I thought must be something special if it has a separate front door. It was very warm in there, and I saw two pairs of shoes sitting neatly by the entrance. I had the feeling someone lived here. I closed the door quietly.

Then I put away my camera, took a deep breath, and decided to go downstairs and ask whoever I encountered for permission to take some photos.

Halfway down the stairs, I heard a voice, changed my mind, and turned back.

I decided that this had been a successful infiltration, and called it a day.



Strolling back towards the gate, the same way I'd come, I spotted a guy through one of the boat's windows, and he spotted me. I waved and came closer, while he quizzically opened his sliding patio door.

"Hi there," said I. "I was wondering who to talk to about maybe getting a tour of this boat, or asking permission to take some photos of it."

"Okay, first of all, was the gate open?"

"Yes, it is open."

He said it shouldn't be. He told me that this was private property, and that just walking in here was the same as walking in to someone's house.

I said I was sorry about that.

"I'm amazed the way people will just walk in to an industrial site like this, an active site where, if they got hurt, we'd be liable."

"Yeah. Curiosity, I guess."

He said some more to the effect that it wasn't okay.

I agreed and said, "But speaking for myself, not being litigious, I'd never dream of blaming someone else if I got hurt ..."

"Yeah, anyway. If you come back during business hours, Tuesday to Friday this week, you can talk to John. He's the lodge manager."

"And he'll be where, here on the boat?"

"Right where I'm standing. You can ask him about a tour or taking photographs."

"Okay, thanks. I did check the office over there first, but didn't find anyone to talk to."

"That's because it's a holiday." He repeated that the gate shouldn't be open. I offered to close it on my way out. "Never mind. You don't know the code."

I thanked him, apologized for the inconvenience, recapped the information he'd given me, and said goodbye.

Later, biking away, I thought how funny it was the way people get angry at you for putting yourself in a position where you might hypothetically get hurt, then hypothetically sue them for not doing a better job of keeping your trespassing ass out of harm's way. And hypothetically get laughed out of court.

I also thought it was funny that he chastised me for "endangering" myself and for showing up after hours, then urged me to come back during business hours, when all that alleged dangerous industrial activity is actually happening.

I wonder if he'd have been as civil if he'd found me on his boat.

-- Postscript. I didn't go back between Tuesday and Friday, because I was busy. Now the lodge is on its way north.




billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 28 on 5/2/2014 9:32 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
I'm such a wimp, I can never just plunge in to any place. Even a wide open door I will pass by, and return to, and pass by, two or three or four times before working up the nerve to walk through.

There is this big yard on the north arm of the Fraser River that is piled with mountains of wood chips. I don't know what they do here -- make wood chips, I guess. Last time I passed by here, the gates were open. I read all the signs carefully, and none of them said "Do not trespass." Still, I didn't have the guts to go in. After all, if someone left this gate open, someone must BE here ...

Today I had the guts to go in.



I biked in and made a brief circuit, half looking for someone to ask permission to take some photos, and half just pretending to look for someone. There was a truck parked by the gate, but no one inside the truck, nor any sign of anyone in the compound. I locked my bike up outside, then strolled in, holding my camera in front of me, more like a badge than a tool. (I was too panicked to take out my tripod.)



I went inside one of the buildings, or structures (they looked to me like big woodchipping machines), but I didn't even explore that fully, because my imagination kept informing me that the owner of the truck was in that room, or in that room, or just beyond that window, so I probably didn't want to go in there, or pass by there. How startled and uncomfortable we'd both be if I burst in on him!


Panic shot.


Another eternal debate: Keep exploring till you've seen everything, and therefore pretty much guarantee bumping into someone; or quit while you're ahead? But when are you ahead?


Occasionally tiny avalanches of wood chips made a pleasant pattering sound.


Back at home, comfy and rational, I am able to put things in perspective: I wasn't doing anything very wrong. I can play dumb and harmless very convincingly. (Actually, I am dumb and harmless.) Being uncomfortable or making people uncomfortable is not a big deal. Even being yelled at is not very serious.

But I'm not very rational when I'm exploring. I'm a wimp.

On my way home, I nerved myself to "squeeze" through the loosely chained gate of this plant.



First, however, I had to take three or four good looks at the gap, and three or four good looks at the one truck parked in one remote corner of the property. After reasoning that no one would lock themselves inside the parking lot with a padlock facing the outside of the gate, I concluded that, though the plant was making a lot of hissy clanky noise, there really probably wasn't anyone on site.

That made this a more comfortable exploration.

All the locked doors made it a disappointing and brief one.




Flareodactyl location:
Vancouver, Canada
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 29 on 5/5/2014 4:59 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Really enjoyed reading all your posts.

Makes me want to go out and do some exploring, which, admittedly, I have been slacking on. Looking forward to your next posts.



http://www.youtube...atch?v=nM_u22RKLcY My Lower Mainland Cliff Jumping Video
TunnelRunner33 location:
Seattle
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 30 on 5/9/2014 8:17 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Billgeorge,

Great posts, I really enjoy the write-ups and descriptions of your thought processes and the encounters you have while exploring. I laughed aloud as you described yourself as a "wimp" that has to build up the courage to just walk into open doors. I don't know if it is simply a lack of experience for me, but I have that same anxiety every time I hop a fence or walk through an open doorway myself. I'm sure many of us do. Maybe it will fade in time, who knows.

Keep up the good work!




If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find him, maybe you can hire... Tunnelrunner33!
PorkRenegade   |  | 
Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 31 on 5/15/2014 12:36 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Well played had my eye on that one, Met tower.


[last edit 5/15/2014 12:37 AM by PorkRenegade - edited 1 times]

god created the au/mc to test the faithful.
billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 32 on 5/20/2014 4:06 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
The only thing stopping me from exploring everywhere is fear -- and hundreds of locked doors.



PorkRenegade   |  | 
Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 33 on 5/21/2014 10:44 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by billgeorge
The only thing stopping me from exploring everywhere is fear -- and hundreds of locked doors.


Indeed once you overcome the first the second gets much easier.



god created the au/mc to test the faithful.
billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 34 on 5/23/2014 10:28 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Posted by PorkRenegade
Well played had my eye on that one, Met tower.


You mean the 'Rotower 3 office tower at 'Rotown? If so, go now. It's slowly going online. Most of the stairwell doors have alarms now, but no one seems to be monitoring them. Lots more locked doors too, but many of their latches are taped to keep them from closing. I thought as the fencing was taken down, this place would get more and more impenetrable. But I guess as long as construction is still going on there will be opportunities for a while yet.

One evening very recently I literally strolled right in the front doors (ignoring the "Construction Personnel Only" signs) at about 8:30 p.m. Didn't see a security guard or another living soul anywhere, and poked around at my leisure, setting off numerous stairwell alarms, for about twenty minutes. Some nice views from the empty upper floors, some of which have balconies.




Elevator control room on the roof. Door was hanging open. Place looked eerily occupied.








billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 35 on 6/6/2014 6:58 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
William T. Vollmann, writing about hopping trains, says cutting fear down to size is an operation "not unlike brushing one's teeth. It must be done over and over." (Or, as the Lululemon bag holding my recyclables reminds me, "Do one thing each day that scares you.")

My goal is to set off one stairwell alarm a day.



LauraPalmer   |  | 
Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 36 on 6/16/2014 3:34 AM >
Posted on Forum: Infiltration ForumsQuote
billgeorge, your missions are awesome !! Very inspiring....keep it up



billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 37 on 7/8/2014 7:11 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Sometimes I think I use urban exploration as what Alan Watts calls a way of liberation -- a way to see through and outgrow some of society's vapid conventions.

At other times, I think I'm just looking for quiet places I can have to myself.



Cemeteries are good places for that. They are like huge manicured parks that hardly anyone ever visits.

The Sea See Burial Park in Burnaby, south of Imperial and west of Patterson, has become one of my favorite places to go for a walk or to sit and mull.

The mausoleums are cool and silent as churches, stately and ornate as museums.







There are many styles of monuments, and they are spruced up by plastic flowers, photos, Christmas cards, poems, or objects beloved of the deceased.



Some families have private sumptuous alcoves:



Outdoors, there are a variety of graves. My favorites are the little enclosed memorial gardens, some of which are pre-purchased, and not yet occupied:



Even the occupied ones provide a pleasant spot for the weary explorer to pause and contemplate his or her mortality, or just enjoy a beer in the cool of the evening.

If you feel the need to trespass on the living, there are a groundskeeper's locker room and equipment storage area under one of the mausoleums, as well as some cluttered fire stairwells. The small chapel has a few back rooms like this one.



Happy exploring, and memento mori!



Tenebrae location:
The Wild West
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 38 on 7/8/2014 10:34 AM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Agreed about the cemeteries (and the East coast ones near/North of Boston are the bomb).
These are great - luminous color; so opulent!



billgeorge location:
Burnaby
 
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Re: Curriculum vitae
<Reply # 39 on 7/8/2014 5:31 PM >
Posted on Forum: UER ForumQuote
Yeah, here's a photo I took last year, while on a bike trip through that area, of Mount Auburn Cemetery outside Boston. I must have spent a few hours just wandering around.







Infiltration Forums > Canada: Alberta / BC > Curriculum vitae(Viewed 19331 times)
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