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UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter (Viewed 381 times)
Asbestos E-Liquid 


Location: Iowa
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 44 likes


I like concrete. It’s either already collapsed or perfectly safe

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Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter
< on 3/23/2020 3:58 AM >
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Posted on Forum: UER Forum

I’d like some general advice and critiques. I think it looks fine, but I’m not an expert on photography. A fresh set of eyes could help me fix a problem I didn’t know I had.




Asbestos E-Liquid 


Location: Iowa
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 44 likes


I like concrete. It’s either already collapsed or perfectly safe

 |  | 
Re: Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter
< Reply # 1 on 3/23/2020 4:00 AM >
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Just to clarify, they got much more blurry when I compressed it down.




ryanpics 


Location: Central Va
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 272 likes


appearance is everything

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Re: Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter
< Reply # 2 on 3/23/2020 9:54 PM >
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I like how the light is harsh, but not too harsh. It's also even across the whole frame which can be hard sometimes. I would just say to change your angle of it so that there's some depth to it. Try getting down to the same level of it and putting it in the foreground and let the rest of the place fill in the background.

A lot of what makes a photo good is a mix between composition and depth. If you look at a bunch of pictures and try to pick out why some look so much better than others, that's often why. I could go deeper and give examples if you want.
Hope this helps.




Asbestos E-Liquid 


Location: Iowa
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 44 likes


I like concrete. It’s either already collapsed or perfectly safe

 |  | 
Re: Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter
< Reply # 3 on 3/23/2020 11:28 PM >
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Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by ryanpics
I like how the light is harsh, but not too harsh. It's also even across the whole frame which can be hard sometimes. I would just say to change your angle of it so that there's some depth to it. Try getting down to the same level of it and putting it in the foreground and let the rest of the place fill in the background.

A lot of what makes a photo good is a mix between composition and depth. If you look at a bunch of pictures and try to pick out why some look so much better than others, that's often why. I could go deeper and give examples if you want.
Hope this helps.


Some examples would be great.




ryanpics 


Location: Central Va
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 272 likes


appearance is everything

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Re: Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter
< Reply # 4 on 3/26/2020 9:55 PM >
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Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Instead of just pointing right at the bottle, he got down on the same level of it and put it off into the left third of the frame while still making sure the rest of the frame was filled with other things.
9 by The Archives of Decay, on Flickr


Here's one that I took recently. There were a bunch of these valves with pressure gauges on them that seemed cool enough to deserve their own picture but I couldn't find a way to get them in a way that I liked. I started trying to get more creative with angles and squat down in front of one when I saw this. I put the gauge in the right third of the frame and let a big panel fill the background. The blur on the panel and it being darker helps separate it from the foreground.
DSC00041 by ryan.little.photo, on Flickr


Here's another I got of some cars in the woods. In this case my subject is in the midground. I put the car on the left side of the frame and got in a position where some other stuff would be blurred out in the foreground filling the bottom right of the screen. I also got right down on the ground so the leaves would add more of a sense of depth. Being zoomed in and going further away will help with this.
DSC09753-Pano by ryan.little.photo, on Flickr

To sum things up, don't be afraid to get right down on the ground or in weird positions. Look for other things that you can use to frame your subject. While it's often easiest to just use the widest angle you can, try zooming in and trying to add more depth to your shots. If you have any other questions feel free to message me.

Hope this helps




Asbestos E-Liquid 


Location: Iowa
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 44 likes


I like concrete. It’s either already collapsed or perfectly safe

 |  | 
Re: Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter
< Reply # 5 on 3/27/2020 2:21 AM >
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Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by ryanpics
Instead of just pointing right at the bottle, he got down on the same level of it and put it off into the left third of the frame while still making sure the rest of the frame was filled with other things.
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49639985401_465012d0cb.jpg9 by The Archives of Decay, on Flickr


Here's one that I took recently. There were a bunch of these valves with pressure gauges on them that seemed cool enough to deserve their own picture but I couldn't find a way to get them in a way that I liked. I started trying to get more creative with angles and squat down in front of one when I saw this. I put the gauge in the right third of the frame and let a big panel fill the background. The blur on the panel and it being darker helps separate it from the foreground.
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49279958303_a3790e48f3.jpgDSC00041 by ryan.little.photo, on Flickr


Here's another I got of some cars in the woods. In this case my subject is in the midground. I put the car on the left side of the frame and got in a position where some other stuff would be blurred out in the foreground filling the bottom right of the screen. I also got right down on the ground so the leaves would add more of a sense of depth. Being zoomed in and going further away will help with this.
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49082812482_6065a51998.jpgDSC09753-Pano by ryan.little.photo, on Flickr

To sum things up, don't be afraid to get right down on the ground or in weird positions. Look for other things that you can use to frame your subject. While it's often easiest to just use the widest angle you can, try zooming in and trying to add more depth to your shots. If you have any other questions feel free to message me.

Hope this helps

It certainly did help! Thanks man




UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Bolts, A Pan, and a Typewriter (Viewed 381 times)


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