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UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Newbie here with a newbie pictures (Viewed 696 times)
MysteriousExpedition  


Location: Chicago, Illinois
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"Adventure is out there"- Charles Muntz

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Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< on 1/22/2020 2:07 AM >
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Hello all!
I'm a new member of these forums. I wanted to share an image and get a few comments regarding what I can improve on. I'm definitely a beginner urbex photographer. Unfortunately, I don't have a very advanced camera nor do I have a full set up or tripod. I just work with what I got at the moment since I'm really low on money at the moment. I am trying to save up for a very good DSLR in the close future though.
A little background about the camera I use. I use a Panasonic Lumix LX100 1. It does pretty well and it shoots at 12.8 MP. Is this enough for us Urbexers? I'm a bit worried about that. It takes some nice low light photos.
I never kept count of the ISO or the other settings. But I will in my future explorations.
I've attached the picture in a response below me.




MysteriousExpedition  


Location: Chicago, Illinois
Total Likes: 93 likes


"Adventure is out there"- Charles Muntz

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 1 on 1/22/2020 2:08 AM >
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1.






ryanpics 


Location: Central Va
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appearance is everything

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 2 on 1/22/2020 3:33 AM >
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I've seen that place before and it's got good photo potential. For your shot, I would've leveled it and either zoomed more onto one part of it or zoomed out to see the whole place. How it is now seems to have an uncomfortable balance between what's shown and what's not. If your lens isn't wide enough to get the whole thing, try going into a corner and taking it.

Your camera generally doesn't matter much as long as you know how to use it. Try to learn how to use manual settings so you can get the most out of the camera. Always shoot in a raw format if you plan on editing the photos at all. The lower your ISO is the cleaner the picture will be. This often means you'll need to have a slow shutter speed to brighten the picture. Find something to put the camera on to keep it still. Any tripod will work but you can use a shelf or box in a pinch. I've used someone's shoulder before.

Just spend lots of time taking pictures and learning about how to use your camera and you'll be taking good pictures in no time. Good luck and happy exploring!




MysteriousExpedition  


Location: Chicago, Illinois
Total Likes: 93 likes


"Adventure is out there"- Charles Muntz

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 3 on 1/22/2020 3:36 AM >
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Thank you for the feedback! I took a few other shots in different angles. But after looking at the photos, they came out much blurrier than I would have liked (probably due to how numb my fingers were from the cold).
Hm, using someone's shoulder is probably one of the most unique ways of shooting without a tripod that I heard of. Might have to try that now lol



[last edit 1/22/2020 3:40 AM by MysteriousExpedition - edited 2 times]

Natchraz 


Location: San Rafael, California
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what could go wrong?

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 4 on 1/22/2020 4:32 AM >
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Start getting used to the manual mode on your camera if you plan to get a DSLR soon, as the pictures with your point-and-shoot will pretty much match up in quality while using auto-mode on a DSLR. In addition, MPs don’t matter too much once you’ve mastered manual mode. Of course you could always look stuff like this up later, as it’s common “manual mode” info, but shutter speed (usually stylized as 2”, 1/250, 1/8000 etc.) is how fast your picture is being taken, aperture is how wide your lens are being opened to allow more or less light intake into your camera (stylized like f/2.0, f/20 etc.), and ISO is the digital area of how much exposure and grain is being allowed into your photo. To get the clearest, most free-of-grain pictures, use a low ISO, a slower shutter speed, and a more narrow/“higher” aperture. Anyways, that’s pretty much the basics concerning manual mode on your camera.




randomesquephoto 
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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 5 on 1/22/2020 5:55 AM >
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Lx100 is a great camera. It has all the manual controls you'll need to take photos.

Taking photos in dark places, a tripod is a must.




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MysteriousExpedition  


Location: Chicago, Illinois
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"Adventure is out there"- Charles Muntz

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 6 on 1/22/2020 7:08 AM >
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Awesome, thank you guys for the tips and suggestions! I'll take those into heart for my next few shots




randomesquephoto 
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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 7 on 1/22/2020 8:22 AM >
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Posted by MysteriousExpedition
Awesome, thank you guys for the tips and suggestions! I'll take those into heart for my next few shots


Your picture won't be still unless your camera is. Tripod is a must. And, changing your camera's metering mode from matrix, to spot meter will help. Then, point your camera, where you want to expose for to get a reading. Matrix metering really gives you a generalized exposure reading, rather than what you want to expose for.




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MysteriousExpedition  


Location: Chicago, Illinois
Total Likes: 93 likes


"Adventure is out there"- Charles Muntz

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 8 on 1/22/2020 6:52 PM >
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Posted by randomesquephoto


Your picture won't be still unless your camera is. Tripod is a must. And, changing your camera's metering mode from matrix, to spot meter will help. Then, point your camera, where you want to expose for to get a reading. Matrix metering really gives you a generalized exposure reading, rather than what you want to expose for.



For sure. Generally, what's a good range for ISO and shutter speed for low light shots in your opinion? My low light shots are okay. But the noise is pretty apparent once I check the results.




blackhawk 

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UER newbie

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 9 on 1/22/2020 7:15 PM >
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Posted by MysteriousExpedition


For sure. Generally, what's a good range for ISO and shutter speed for low light shots in your opinion? My low light shots are okay. But the noise is pretty apparent once I check the results.


Brace the cam on a solid object and don't jar it when you hit the shutter.
A brush towel can be used to rest the cam on.
With care you can grab shots down to 1/20 second or so.
Anything solid will work, chair, door frame, wall, phone pole, etc.
Hell put it right down on the floor if that height works.

Freedom to shoot at multiple heights/positions with near zero set up time is a nice break from the burden of a tripod.
Higher throw away rates are the trade off.
Experiment and see what you can do.

ISO limits depend on the cam's hardware, the subject and how much noise is acceptable. Newer pro, semi-pro cams can shoot in much lower light/higher iso than a decade ago.
Good results easily up to iso 400.
Never shoot below the cam's native ISO value, which is generally 100; it will degrade the image.
Shutter speed is determined by exposure...




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Deuterium 


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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 10 on 1/22/2020 10:56 PM >
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Posted by MysteriousExpedition
For sure. Generally, what's a good range for ISO and shutter speed for low light shots in your opinion? My low light shots are okay. But the noise is pretty apparent once I check the results.


That depends on the camera. This is where camera actually matters. Even old compact cameras that offers manual exposure in menu takes decent low light photo when you set the ISO at 50 or 100 and let it exposure 5-30 seconds. The trick back in the days with cameras that didn't let you change settings manually was to play around with settings like fireworks mode and night sky and such.

If you have an expensive camera with very good low light performance and clean high ISO quality, you can hand hold the camera and use I.S. at 1/60-1/4" at ISO 12,800 and get a decent result. This is a big deal, because you can forego the tripod a lot of the time. Tripod is bulky and annoying a lot of the time.




randomesquephoto 
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Don't be a Maxx

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 11 on 1/23/2020 2:25 AM >
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Posted by MysteriousExpedition


For sure. Generally, what's a good range for ISO and shutter speed for low light shots in your opinion? My low light shots are okay. But the noise is pretty apparent once I check the results.


You're probably pushing it above iso 800 on that camera. And a general rule is the lowest shutter speed handheld is that if the focal length you are using.
I mean, really, you'll see the results you are using. You'll have less noise the lower the ISO. The slower the shutter speed, the more shake you'll introduce holding the camera.
Place the camera on something that doesn't move. Use the self timer, so your pushing the shutter doesn't effect shake.





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randomesquephoto 
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Don't be a Maxx

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 12 on 1/23/2020 2:35 AM >
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Here is a good review of your camera, by the only reviewer I actually care for that is an actual good photographer with a decent opinion. The images in the review are fantastic.

He says-

"I’d suggest limiting auto-ISO to 800 or lower – firstly because your lens is fast enough, and secondly, the IS system is good enough to make those marginal 1/20-ish shutter speeds mostly fine".

So, that's a decent guide... Of course a generalisation because there is other factors involved as well.

Here is the link-

https://blog.mingt...0-leica-d-lux-109/




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randomesquephoto 
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Don't be a Maxx

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 13 on 1/23/2020 2:37 AM >
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So, rehash, short answer. Yes, your camera is fine. That is not an issue. Learn how to use it in the situations you want to use it.




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MysteriousExpedition  


Location: Chicago, Illinois
Total Likes: 93 likes


"Adventure is out there"- Charles Muntz

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Re: Newbie here with a newbie pictures
< Reply # 14 on 1/23/2020 3:24 AM >
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Very solid advice from everyone, thank you. I checked the settings of my camera and tested the intelligence auto and it's definitely not ideal for my situation. Especially for low light. Going manual from now on



[last edit 1/23/2020 3:27 AM by MysteriousExpedition - edited 1 times]

UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Newbie here with a newbie pictures (Viewed 696 times)


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