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UER Forum > Rookie Forum > Spiders, snakes, etc. (Viewed 10008 times)
ZAZ 
(aka: zaz3494)


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Spiders, snakes, etc.
< on 2/17/2019 3:59 PM >
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Hello everyone, I am wanting to start a discussion on threatening creatures or wildlife that we may encounter while UE.

In Korea we have one venomous spider called the Banana Spider. I have seen it while exploring and a fellow UER member almost walked right into one sitting in it's web face first. The venom will cause pain and blisters but will not be enough to kill. Here's an article I read. https://traveltips...spiders-korea-1015

Banana Spider in Korea
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I've been trying to do some research on venomous snakes as well. My buddy has seen a Mamushi inside a location here in Korea, but I have yet to see any snakes while exploring here yet. I'm sure that will change once winter ends. Mamushi snakes can be deadly to humans, here is a link to an article and a video of one up close in Japan.
Article: https://snake-fact...y.com/mamushi.html
Video(really cool): https://m.youtube....atch?v=HXHM9lJCcvU

Mamushi Snake
428852.jpg (85 kb, 800x600)
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I look forward to see what everyone else has encountered so I can learn some more. I'm still a rookie when it comes to stuff like this.




ZAZ 
(aka: zaz3494)


Location: Georgia, USA
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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 1 on 2/17/2019 4:07 PM >
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Unbroken banana spider link. https://traveltips...-korea-101535.html





Steed 


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 2 on 2/17/2019 4:28 PM >
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Banana spiders can sting, but they have about as much interest in you as you do in them. As long as you don't walk into a ton of webs with a lot of them, you'll probably avoid any bites.

For our part of the world, there's a Japanese wasp that's said to have a deadly sting. I recall hearing about a Something Awful meetup in Korea a few years ago where they spent a weekend at a cabin, and a wasp got in and everyone started freaking out.

Probably a bigger concern is ticks, especially in fall, and of course wild boars.

However, I still consider humans to be the most dangerous animal we're likely to encounter.




ZAZ 
(aka: zaz3494)


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 3 on 2/17/2019 4:36 PM >
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Posted by Steed


Probably a bigger concern is ticks, especially in fall, and of course wild boars.



I've read about those wasps a bit, I'll have to read some more. Also, I was talking to Juge about ticks today. What's the best way to avoid them besides just checking yourself afterwards? Is tick repellent a thing? I've never had one burrow and plan to keep it that way.




becckeez 


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 4 on 2/17/2019 6:23 PM >
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It gets cold in my part of the world.

We have no spiders, snakes, or ticks (hurray!). We have mosquitoes.

They show up as the snow begins to melt, and hang around until the temperatures start to drop. If you have a breeze blow, or it has been exceptionally hot and dry - you can avoid the hoards. Otherwise, these suckers are expected to show up en masse just about anywhere that's not paved with concrete.

Hoods work in more urban areas in places like Anchorage or Fairbanks. Backcountry or tundra you're gonna wanna take some nets. Face nets for the hike, and make sure your tent is equipped with good bug nets. If you're spending time in a cabin, bed nets wouldn't hurt either. It ceases to amaze me how many there are in high season (june-july) and how they can get into everything. The video below is a great example of what I'm talking about.




We also have large mammals!

Bears, wolves, lynx, and critters like wolverines and porcupines more or less just want to be left alone. The trick is being super aware of your surroundings and making noise where you're headed. This can be tricky if you're trying to sneak anywhere. Compensate with being SUPER DUPER aware. Learn your scat and tracks and know how to avoid! The majority of reports and people I've known that have found themselves in bad situations with large mammals have been either:
- partying drunk and unaware in the woods
- exercising or hunting with headphones on
- bushwhacking in the rain

P.S. The lady elders in one of the villages I've lived in swore that flashing my tits at a bear would offput the bear and distract it enough for me to get away.
P.S.S. I've tried it and it works. So. There's that if you find yourself in a really tight spot.







blackhawk 

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 5 on 2/17/2019 6:27 PM >
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Posted by zaz3494


I've read about those wasps a bit, I'll have to read some more. Also, I was talking to Juge about ticks today. What's the best way to avoid them besides just checking yourself afterwards? Is tick repellent a thing? I've never had one burrow and plan to keep it that way.



Ticks are vectors for many deadly, life altering diseases. Some incurable.

Wear high top boots, lace in pants inside boots.
You can seal them with duct tape although I never do.
Spray the bug juice around the top of the boots and some of the lower pants.
Shave head is best plus a bush hat.
Ticks have been known to drop out of trees from above the person. Generally it's from contact with vegetation as you brush against it. Avoid contact with it as much as you reasonably can even if it means detouring bad areas.

Avoid deer trails and areas where they bed down.
*Do frequent checks for them when sploring.
Avoid highly infested areas.
Be very cautious in areas known to have high tick borne disease rates including where you live.

ALWAYS do a complete strip naked tick search at the end of the day or splore.
Look everywhere, carefully!
Some are so small you feel them many times before you notice them. These are can be the most dangerous ones.
Bag the clothes securely and wash before using again.
Some diseases you have only until they attach themselves to prevent infection, others 3-12 hours to be on the safe side.

I got Lyme disease from a tick in short grass in front of my house. Never saw it; deer tick, underarm.
If you get really sick 2-30 days after a possible exposure be sure the doctor knows it!
It may sound like a pain in the ass to do these things every time, but getting any of the diseases they carry will cost you far more time, and maybe even your life.




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corvidcache 


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 6 on 2/17/2019 7:36 PM >
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Posted by becckeez

P.S. The lady elders in one of the villages I've lived in swore that flashing my tits at a bear would offput the bear and distract it enough for me to get away.
P.S.S. I've tried it and it works. So. There's that if you find yourself in a really tight spot.




Thanks! I will keep that in mind, and if I die trying, at least people will laugh.

During the fall I went on an adventure to a place that turned out not to be abandoned anymore (oops), and instead wandered around in the woods for a few hours. I found several piles what I thought looked like horse shit, but it was in a place where a horse would have had trouble navigating the dense trees. It was also mostly apple skins and berry seeds. Horse poop? Again, oops. A BEAR shits in the woods, not a horse. We have black bears.

As for ticks, I got my first ones last spring. I was an idiot and went out to a former NJ munitions plant in a pair of shorts, high socks, and a hoodie. Every couple minutes we were brushing ticks off each other and I knew I was screwed. I'd seen ticks before, but not that many in one day! I ended up with one under my sock on my calf, and one right above the lip of my shorts on my thigh. My partner only got one, but it was lodged in his armpit between hairs, and was a lot harder to get out than mine were. The one thing I have to add that I've heard about those suckers is to remove them ASAP; the less time they spend on you the better. You don't want them to open you up enough to swell, or whatever pathogens they're carrying will have more of a bridge to cross, so to speak. After you remove them, if you're at home, you could burn them, drown them in isopropyl alcohol (that's my method so I can examine them afterward because bugs are neat), or flush them down the toilet. My mom told me that growing up in PA she burned them, but now I also hear stories about people burning down their houses trying to kill insects & arachnids.

I have only seen garter snakes in the PNW around where I live, and they're nothing but cute. IF they bite, they're not venomous, and they've only got teeth in the back of their mouth, so you might not feel them. They also give live birth, but that's got nothing to do with your safety; it's cool.

I did get my first bee sting last summer when I was hiking somewhere I wasn't supposed to (the sign said "police property" but it was obviously bee property). (Also, to be honest I didn't see my assailant - I only heard it - and it could have been a yellowjacket not a bee.) That shit did NOT feel good, but I'm glad it took me 27 years to get my first one.




The #1 rule about poking things with sticks is never use your finger.
blackhawk 

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 7 on 2/17/2019 8:59 PM >
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Posted by corvidcache


Thanks! I will keep that in mind, and if I die trying, at least people will laugh.


I have only seen garter snakes in the PNW around where I live, and they're nothing but cute. IF they bite, they're not venomous, and they've only got teeth in the back of their mouth, so you might not feel them. They also give live birth, but that's got nothing to do with your safety; it's cool.

I did get my first bee sting last summer when I was hiking somewhere I wasn't supposed to (the sign said "police property" but it was obviously bee property). (Also, to be honest I didn't see my assailant - I only heard it - and it could have been a yellowjacket not a bee.) That shit did NOT feel good, but I'm glad it took me 27 years to get my first one.


Lol, the bear might think you're offering them milk.

We have no aggressive venomous snakes in North America. Simply walk away.
Do not handle or try to kill one, that's how most people here get envenomated.
Most parts of the world do have aggressive venomous snakes... they will chase you.

Honey bees only attack (sting) to protect their nests or if crushed. Perfume, bright colors attach them.
Yellow jackets don't care, they’ll sting on a lark as they're flying by.
I've lost count how many times I've been stung. Like to have slap fights with wasps and bees.
Honey bees that aren’t Africanized will always fly away even when provoked unless it's their hive they are protecting...
The alpha scout honeybees are more aggressive but they too will eventually fly off when provoked without stinging. In the desert they get can very aggressive around nectar and water sources.

Even those desert honeybees are better tempered than yellow jackets which are trash insects providing little if any useful function.
Desert honey bee behavior resembles yellow jacket aggressiveness though; insects are more aggressive in the desert as survival dictates.




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corvidcache 


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 8 on 2/18/2019 12:26 AM >
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Posted by blackhawk

We have no aggressive venomous snakes in North America. Simply walk away.
Do not handle or try to kill one, that's how most people here get envenomated.
Most parts of the world do have aggressive venomous snakes... they will chase you.



Yes, good point. I've come pretty close (3ft) to stepping on a Western diamondback. It didn't seem interested in doing anything but getting to the other side of the trail. I guess I've been taking it for granted that they don't hunt us. Thanks, snakes of North America!




The #1 rule about poking things with sticks is never use your finger.
istone111 


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 9 on 2/18/2019 12:41 AM >
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Ticks are definitely my least favorite thing in the US Southeast.. like blackhawk said, they carry diseases that you can't get rid of and some that could kill you. Ticks are no fun. They're also just so small and you get them at random. There are also these tiny tiny little red bugs that you usually can't even see no matter what (in my experience). They're called chiggers. I explored this abandoned house one time, never felt or noticed anything unusual, I was wearing long socks and skin tight clothes, my legs and feet weren't exposed at all.. when I woke up the next morning, both of the tops of my feet and ankles.. were covered in over fifty total different and spread out bites. It was horrible, three weeks of constant miserable pain before they finally went away.

I've seen one or two black widows in abandoned houses and a couple more in other non-urbex contexts, those aren't fun. In NC, we have a venomous snake called a copperhead, I've seen more of those in my backyard then anywhere else though!




blackhawk 

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 10 on 2/18/2019 1:21 AM >
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Posted by corvidcache


Yes, good point. I've come pretty close (3ft) to stepping on a Western diamondback. It didn't seem interested in doing anything but getting to the other side of the trail. I guess I've been taking it for granted that they don't hunt us. Thanks, snakes of North America!


The rattlers hear sensor organs are accurate within half a degree at the 3 foot range if I remember correctly.
They are keenly aware of you at around 3-5 feet because of this. They know your too big to be prey. Some people misunderstand when they take a defensive posture; it is just that.
Rattlers will be killed if they try to flee a predator, so they stand their ground. Even then the chances aren't good.
If you handle them gently with a 5 foot long walking stick most are normally quit mellow once they sort out you mean them no harm. Keeping your body heat away from them helps a lot. Going hands on is dangerous because they see your body heat and know you're warm blooded; a potential predator.

Steve Irwin handled the Western Diamondbacks like they were nothing but he had decades of experience handling venomous snakes.
The most I've done is let the tail of one slide through my hand after I got off the road. Probably could have handled it but just not worth the risk.

Just be careful not to accidently step on one. Their camo is extremely good. Every time I relocated one it amazed me how rapidly they vanished into the desert vegetation.
Like the Predator, just gone.
Normally if the feel your footfalls they will try to hide. In sand this is blunted. Be aware of that.
&
Never put your hands where you can't see.


One that's being relocated. He was by the front tire of my van under it.
He rattled as I walked by which was strange as the engine wasn't running
He was catching some shade from the noon heat. Even though I was nearby, never saw him go under the van. Normally nocturnal they do come put in the day sometimes.
Easily got him into this small bucket with my walking stick and took him about 50 yards away.
He found an unseen hole by a small mesquite tree and vanished within less then a minute.




Just when I thought I was out... they pulled me back in.
ZAZ 
(aka: zaz3494)


Location: Georgia, USA
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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 11 on 2/18/2019 9:29 AM >
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The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention has good information for Ticks on their website. It lists information and symptoms of many of the diseases that ticks carry and also additional information on how to avoid and remove ticks properly. It has a map where different species live as well.
https://www.cdc.go...iseases/index.html

Here's some information they had below:

Tickborne Diseases of the United States

Anaplasmosis is transmitted to humans by tick bites primarily from the
blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.

Babesiosis is caused by microscopic parasites that infect red blood cells. Most human cases of babesiosis in the U.S. are caused by Babesia microti. Babesia microti is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and is found primarily in the northeast and upper midwest.

Borrelia mayonii infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the upper midwestern United States. It has been found in blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Borrelia mayonii is a new species and is the only species besides B. burgdorferi known to cause Lyme disease in North America.

Borrelia miyamotoi infection has recently been described as a cause of illness in the U.S. It is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and has a range similar to that of Lyme disease.

Bourbon virus infection has been identified in a limited number patients in the Midwest and southern United States. At this time, we do not know if the virus might be found in other areas of the United States.

Colorado tick fever is caused by a virus transmitted by the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni). It occurs in the the Rocky Mountain states at elevations of 4,000 to 10,500 feet.

Ehrlichiosis is transmitted to humans by the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found primarily in the southcentral and eastern U.S.

Heartland virus cases have been identified in the Midwestern and southern United States. Studies suggest that Lone Star ticks can transmit the virus. It is unknown if the virus may be found in other areas of the U.S.

Lyme disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the northeastern U.S. and upper midwestern U.S. and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) along the Pacific coast.

Powassan disease is transmitted by the blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the groundhog tick (Ixodes cookei). Cases have been reported primarily from northeastern states and the Great Lakes region.

Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis is transmitted to humans by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum).

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is transmitted by the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sangunineus) in the U.S. The brown dog tick and other tick species are associated with RMSF in Central and South America.

STARI (Southern tick-associated rash illness) is transmitted via bites from the lone star tick (Ambylomma americanum), found in the southeastern and eastern U.S.

Tickborne relapsing fever (TBRF) is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected soft ticks. TBRF has been reported in 15 states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming and is associated with sleeping in rustic cabins and vacation homes.

Tularemia is transmitted to humans by the dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Tularemia occurs throughout the U.S.

364D rickettsiosis (Rickettsia phillipi, proposed) is transmitted to humans by the Pacific Coast tick (Dermacentor occidentalis ticks). This is a new disease that has been found in California.




ZAZ 
(aka: zaz3494)


Location: Georgia, USA
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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 12 on 2/18/2019 9:46 AM >
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Posted by becckeez
It gets cold in my part of the world.

We have no spiders, snakes, or ticks (hurray!). We have mosquitoes.



Oh God.... it looks as if they could eat you alive. Bet Alaska gets some pretty unique 911 calls.




becckeez 


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trippin.

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 13 on 2/18/2019 3:42 PM >
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Posted by zaz3494
The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention has good information for Ticks on their website. It lists information and symptoms of many of the diseases that ticks carry and also additional information on how to avoid and remove ticks properly. It has a map where different species live as well.
https://www.cdc.go...iseases/index.html



Ticks, man. I really do not like ticks. The maps are super neat.
Of course almost all the ticks in the U.S. can be located in Southeast.
I'm in the process of moving back to tick central - fantastic. LOL.

Freakin' ticks.
And chiggers. Those lovely things too. Ugh.




blackhawk 

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 14 on 2/18/2019 3:48 PM >
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Posted by becckeez


Ticks, man. I really do not like ticks. The maps are super neat.
Of course almost all the ticks in the U.S. can be located in Southeast.
I'm in the process of moving back to tick central - fantastic. LOL.

Freakin' ticks.
And chiggers. Those lovely things too. Ugh.


Bed bugs are worse.
Suspected of transmitting at least some of the tick diseases...




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Juxobe 


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China, IL is the best at math

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 15 on 2/22/2019 2:26 PM >
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There is a tick in up in Duluth MN I've heard can apparently make you deathly allergic to red meat. I don"t know if that is true or what virus or what ever does that but I am not going up there anytime soon




If there is something I want to do then Ill do it and if there is something I don't want to do than I wont do it. That's the Dandy way baby.
blackhawk 

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 16 on 2/22/2019 2:52 PM >
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Posted by Juxobe
There is a tick in up in Duluth MN I've heard can apparently make you deathly allergic to red meat. I don"t know if that is true or what virus or what ever does that but I am not going up there anytime soon


That's the Lone Star tick.
It can make you allergic to a type of sugar found only in beef.
https://www.mayocl...auses/syc-20428608

https://www.cdc.go..._distribution.html



[last edit 2/22/2019 2:52 PM by blackhawk - edited 1 times]

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stealthwraith 


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 17 on 2/22/2019 3:07 PM >
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Ticks are awful. I had a weekend a couple years ago in the Hudson valley where I did some bushwhacking and carefully checked for ticks. All good. No issues. It was when I cut past a slow moving family on a public walking trail that I ended up getting a tick on me. Luckily I brushed it off my clothing, but it really drove home that they can appear from anywhere.

Bed bugs are the worst though. You don’t even need to be exploring yet to encounter them. The only time I’ve encountered them was at a fancier than usual for me hotel. Taking time out of my vacation to do some intense heat wash and dry of my clothing was not appreciated.

Spiders? That’s what my tripod is for most of the time. Do I look like a lunatic waving a stick around in front of me to clear webs? Yep. But I don’t care.

Snakes? I work to avoid by exploring in colder months because once my cows escaped and in trying to retrieve them I came within inches of stepping in a nest of baby rattlers in flip flops (numerous poor choices that day but the cost of getting the cows back from the sherif had been high the previous time)




Stealth: adj. designed in accordance with technology that makes detection difficult. Wraith: n. A wisp or faint trace of something
Abby Normal 


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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 18 on 2/23/2019 2:25 AM >
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Wandering around the desert like we do, we've come across almost every desert reptile, bug, and animal that you can think of. Most are pretty harmless, some downright beautiful, but rattlesnakes are the one thing that I worry about. I've had a few run-ins with them, including rappelling down a shaft and finding myself hanging right between two rattlers, one coiled up on each opposite wall. So far it's Abby 4, rattle snakes 0.



Now that the regional hospital in Tonopah has closed, we are four hours from medical attention if something serious happens. A rattlesnake bite would probably require a flight-for-life trip down to Vegas.

The tarantulas and scorpions look a bit scary, but aren't really that dangerous. The rest of the wildlife is a treat to see.



Abby Normal



[last edit 2/23/2019 2:28 AM by Abby Normal - edited 1 times]

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ryanpics 


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appearance is everything

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Re: Spiders, snakes, etc.
< Reply # 19 on 2/23/2019 2:36 AM >
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Having spent the majority of my life outdoors, I've encountered many different "threats" but none while exploring except once. I was at an old motel and there was a mountain lion hiding in the bushes. I started walking up a brushy path, it hissed, and I ran away as fast as I could and left. The place wasn't very good anyway. I've run into many bears, snakes, spiders, ticks, and whatever else there is to run into while biking. Rattlesnakes and copperheads are pretty common in the mountains here but you just need to keep some space. My first run in with a rattler was when I was like 9. I was trying to see how loud I could get it to rattle lol. Bears are generally chill as long as you aren't interfering with them. It's different if a cub's there too but I haven't had any problems. Ticks are nasty as everyone knows. A tick left on the scrotum for too long will leave you quite uncomfortable for a few weeks. When I was 6 I stepped in a yellow jackets nest. Apparently I was covered from head to toe in em but that's what adrenaline is for. I didn't feel a thing but I was very sore afterwards. They called an ambulance and checked me out and i guess I was ok. Spiders are just annoying. Always have a stick. The second you put it down you'll get a web right in your face.




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