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UER Forum > UE Main > Conquering Your Fear of Heights (Viewed 2993 times)
swiftone 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 40 on 9/23/2017 4:49 PM >
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I have seen some very round and large people do work on line. Rappelling is easier obviously because gravity is working for you. Depending on your decent device and diameter of line as well as your weight can dictate how fast you go down. Simple 8s and ATCs were my fav when I was into it big. Larger folks may need a device that creates more friction. It's going up line that can be quite a chore. There is a bit of a work out as well as an art to it. But being at least a bit in shape can help tremendously. Canyoning is a whole different animal. Lol. There is going up going down, crawling, bouldering, etc. Canyoning is not for the couch potato in my opinion. It's has been my experience that when working with climbing gear that the fear is compounded to the novice. Fear of heights as well as trusting your hardware.

The learning curve can be quite big when learning climnbing, rappelling, high angle, and canyoning. A very good knowledge in rope work with knots, tension stength, and line care is paramount. As well as understanding how the hardware (carabiners, tie off pints, decent devices, hex nuts, cams, etc) works as well as how and when use different tools in the bag. It's one of those sports where a mistake may cost you your life but knowing that makes any person with half a brain really learn it well before executing the skills on their own. But, it's definitely doable. And can be a lot of fun. It's a trip being suspended a 100 or more feet off of a canyon bottom by a line that is only 8-11mm in diameter.



[last edit 9/23/2017 4:58 PM by swiftone - edited 1 times]

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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 41 on 9/23/2017 4:58 PM >
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Thanks for the info. For me, weight wouldn't be an issue, I've always been fairly thin (around 140 lbs and 5'8"). That said, I haven't engaged in regular aerobic activity in a while.




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Abby Normal 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 42 on 9/24/2017 4:09 AM >
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Posted by Dee Ashley


I would love to do something like this! Do you have to be in crazy good shape to do this or can you manage if you can still eek out, say a mile run if you tried really hard (and you're a female)? That's the best comparison I could come up with, lol, since I don't have any experience with this kind of thing. I used to be really athletic, but I'm approaching 40 and my only exercise of late is hiking into a location or maybe hopping the proverbial fence or two.

Edit: How hard or complicated is the learning curve for something like this to get to a point where you're (relatively) comfortable in your ability?

I'd be afraid I wouldn't be able to climb back out!



So let me pass along my perspective. Being in great shape and athletic would certainly be a help, but it's not a requirement. I sit at a desk for a living and will be turning 60 in a couple of weeks. I'm not in horrible shape, but I'm not hitting the gym regularly either. (That said, some gym time specifically targeted at cardio, legs, and arms does help. I just have to get back at it.) I can pretty easily do a 100' climb and could double that without needing assistance.

There are a couple of things that really help ascending. First is having your climbing gear properly set up. I use what is known as a "Frog" rig for ascending. Having each of the straps the correct length made a big difference in how efficient I can climb. I also use a harness made for caving which has the attachment point much lower than a typical climbing harness. Little things that add up to a good rig.

Second is technique. Doing the frog step is easy enough. Doing it efficiently takes practice. Once you get your technique right and find your own climbing pace, it's amazing how far you can climb. Many people suggest taking as large of a "step" as possible each time. For me, I found that taking a shorter step is less strenuous and I can keep a better rhythm going.


Here is a website you can go to read through a 10 part tutorial on caving. Caving techniques are much more useful in a mine than are most rock climbing methods. Certainly caving is different than mine exploring, but many of the techniques are the same.

http://cavediggers.com/vertical/

Keep in mind that a tutorial like this will not teach you how to rappel or ascend. It will help you understand the methods and techniques, but first hand training is necessary. Your best bet is to find someone qualified to teach you. If there is a local caving grotto near where you live, they usually have folks who are very knowledgeable.

Oh yeah, buy yourself a 15' piece of 7mm or 8mm rope and start learning your knots. They are important and you want to be able to tie them without thinking. Early on you probably won't be rigging your own anchors, but you show know all the knots necessary to do so. (chapter 3 in the tutorial is a good starting point).

Vertical can be a bit daunting, but it can open up amazing explorations. We get to go places that no one has seen in the last 50 to 75 years. That's what keeps me looking for the next mine to explore.


Anyway, those are my thoughts for now.

Abby Normal








"Government is not a solution to our problem, government is the problem." Ronald Reagan
blackhawk 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 43 on 9/24/2017 4:46 AM >
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Posted by Abby Normal



So let me pass along my perspective. Being in great shape and athletic would certainly be a help, but it's not a requirement. I sit at a desk for a living and will be turning 60 in a couple of weeks. I'm not in horrible shape, but I'm not hitting the gym regularly either. (That said, some gym time specifically targeted at cardio, legs, and arms does help. I just have to get back at it.) I can pretty easily do a 100' climb and could double that without needing assistance.

There are a couple of things that really help ascending. First is having your climbing gear properly set up. I use what is known as a "Frog" rig for ascending. Having each of the straps the correct length made a big difference in how efficient I can climb. I also use a harness made for caving which has the attachment point much lower than a typical climbing harness. Little things that add up to a good rig.

Second is technique. Doing the frog step is easy enough. Doing it efficiently takes practice. Once you get your technique right and find your own climbing pace, it's amazing how far you can climb. Many people suggest taking as large of a "step" as possible each time. For me, I found that taking a shorter step is less strenuous and I can keep a better rhythm going.


Here is a website you can go to read through a 10 part tutorial on caving. Caving techniques are much more useful in a mine than are most rock climbing methods. Certainly caving is different than mine exploring, but many of the techniques are the same.

http://cavediggers.com/vertical/

Keep in mind that a tutorial like this will not teach you how to rappel or ascend. It will help you understand the methods and techniques, but first hand training is necessary. Your best bet is to find someone qualified to teach you. If there is a local caving grotto near where you live, they usually have folks who are very knowledgeable.

Oh yeah, buy yourself a 15' piece of 7mm or 8mm rope and start learning your knots. They are important and you want to be able to tie them without thinking. Early on you probably won't be rigging your own anchors, but you show know all the knots necessary to do so. (chapter 3 in the tutorial is a good starting point).

Vertical can be a bit daunting, but it can open up amazing explorations. We get to go places that no one has seen in the last 50 to 75 years. That's what keeps me looking for the next mine to explore.


Anyway, those are my thoughts for now.

Abby Normal








This has interested me for sometime more for exercise but occasionally it come in handy like for a certain open missile silo...

When I did bridge and tank painting, hemp is the only rope we used for the boson's chair drops.
It's cheap, easy to grip and easy to inspect; hidden internal damage doesn't happen. It got replaced usually after a season or as wear dictated.
We used 3/4 inch Grade A Manila rope and nothing else for critical applications.

Is this used by anyone for climbing?
If so does techniques for usage differ since it is a thicker rope?






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Abby Normal 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 44 on 9/25/2017 4:08 AM >
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Posted by blackhawk



This has interested me for sometime more for exercise but occasionally it come in handy like for a certain open missile silo...

When I did bridge and tank painting, hemp is the only rope we used for the boson's chair drops.
It's cheap, easy to grip and easy to inspect; hidden internal damage doesn't happen. It got replaced usually after a season or as wear dictated.
We used 3/4 inch Grade A Manila rope and nothing else for critical applications.

Is this used by anyone for climbing?
If so does techniques for usage differ since it is a thicker rope?




I've never seen anyone use hemp/manila rope in a sport climbing, rappelling, caving, or mine exploring environment. Everything I've ever seen used has been synthetic. I wouldn't even know the type of ascenders and descenders to use with a 3 strand natural fiber rope. Back in the 70's (yes, I'm that old) we used static 3 strand synthetic rope for rappelling, but even then we used kernmantle for climbing. Of course that was sport, not commercial/industrial.

Abby





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blackhawk 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 45 on 9/25/2017 5:06 AM >
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Posted by Abby Normal



I've never seen anyone use hemp/manila rope in a sport climbing, rappelling, caving, or mine exploring environment. Everything I've ever seen used has been synthetic. I wouldn't even know the type of ascenders and descenders to use with a 3 strand natural fiber rope. Back in the 70's (yes, I'm that old) we used static 3 strand synthetic rope for rappelling, but even then we used kernmantle for climbing. Of course that was sport, not commercial/industrial.

Abby




Thank you.
I was afraid of that, but not surprised. It's tensile strength isn't as great, nor is it as pliable as synthetic. No shock absorbing qualities like the synthetics which makes it more efficient to climb but not good at all for fall arresting.

Manilla rope is a different animal entirely. The painters liked it because solvents from the paint didn't readily attack it. It's very predictable and easy to read wear or rot.
It "stretches" and thins out a bit after you have a working load on it, then retains that diameter/length.
It's easy to grip with gloves or bare handed and absorbs sweat.




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Abby Normal 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 46 on 9/28/2017 2:50 AM >
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Posted by blackhawk


Thank you.
I was afraid of that, but not surprised. It's tensile strength isn't as great, nor is it as pliable as synthetic. No shock absorbing qualities like the synthetics which makes it more efficient to climb but not good at all for fall arresting.

Manilla rope is a different animal entirely. The painters liked it because solvents from the paint didn't readily attack it. It's very predictable and easy to read wear or rot.
It "stretches" and thins out a bit after you have a working load on it, then retains that diameter/length.
It's easy to grip with gloves or bare handed and absorbs sweat.



Well if you are interested in doing some vertical exploration, it might be the time to move to synthetic. The wide variety of ascenders and descenders makes it easy to set up a rig that's just right for you. Of course it's not particularly cheap especially if you are buying your static rope at the same time. But depending on where you like to explore, it can open up some great areas. Plus it's kind'a fun. On longer hangs, it's a good workout of strength and cardio. And coordination. I struggle with the whole coordination part.

Abby




"Government is not a solution to our problem, government is the problem." Ronald Reagan
Dee Ashley 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 47 on 9/28/2017 3:14 AM >
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Posted by Abby Normal



So let me pass along my perspective. Being in great shape and athletic would certainly be a help, but it's not a requirement. I sit at a desk for a living and will be turning 60 in a couple of weeks. I'm not in horrible shape, but I'm not hitting the gym regularly either. (That said, some gym time specifically targeted at cardio, legs, and arms does help. I just have to get back at it.) I can pretty easily do a 100' climb and could double that without needing assistance.

There are a couple of things that really help ascending. First is having your climbing gear properly set up. I use what is known as a "Frog" rig for ascending. Having each of the straps the correct length made a big difference in how efficient I can climb. I also use a harness made for caving which has the attachment point much lower than a typical climbing harness. Little things that add up to a good rig.

Second is technique. Doing the frog step is easy enough. Doing it efficiently takes practice. Once you get your technique right and find your own climbing pace, it's amazing how far you can climb. Many people suggest taking as large of a "step" as possible each time. For me, I found that taking a shorter step is less strenuous and I can keep a better rhythm going.


Here is a website you can go to read through a 10 part tutorial on caving. Caving techniques are much more useful in a mine than are most rock climbing methods. Certainly caving is different than mine exploring, but many of the techniques are the same.

http://cavediggers.com/vertical/

Keep in mind that a tutorial like this will not teach you how to rappel or ascend. It will help you understand the methods and techniques, but first hand training is necessary. Your best bet is to find someone qualified to teach you. If there is a local caving grotto near where you live, they usually have folks who are very knowledgeable.

Oh yeah, buy yourself a 15' piece of 7mm or 8mm rope and start learning your knots. They are important and you want to be able to tie them without thinking. Early on you probably won't be rigging your own anchors, but you show know all the knots necessary to do so. (chapter 3 in the tutorial is a good starting point).

Vertical can be a bit daunting, but it can open up amazing explorations. We get to go places that no one has seen in the last 50 to 75 years. That's what keeps me looking for the next mine to explore.


Anyway, those are my thoughts for now.

Abby Normal







Thank you for such a detailed response!
Half the battle is finding other people that are also interested in this type of thing, and seeing that I live in quite possibly the flattest region in the world, rock climbing is not the most common of activities around here (but certainly alive and well).
I've always enjoyed reading your posts. I don't see as many actual cavers on here as I do other types of explores, so you add a cool, unique dimension to these forums, IMO.
I'd love to meet up if I'm ever in your area one day.
Cheers, Dee




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yokes 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 48 on 9/28/2017 3:46 PM >
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Me and heights just do not get along, and have come to an agreement that we will not be around each other as much as possible.




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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 49 on 9/29/2017 7:54 PM >
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Hello, it's not unusual for people to be scared of heights, most of us spend the majority of time on the ground... Going above second floor isn't a common thing for everybody. So yes I did have to conquer my fear of heights too. I did it by climbing a Railway bridge in 3 attempts (3 visits). I wasn't wearing any safety equipment which really pushed my fears out of the way.

Take a look of that sketchy thing... Yes it's still very well active for freights (specially when climbing the bridge with one passing over you for a solid 2 minutes, shaking everything you touch).







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blackhawk 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 50 on 9/29/2017 9:04 PM >
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Posted by Rusty Canadian
Hello, it's not unusual for people to be scared of heights, most of us spend the majority of time on the ground... Going above second floor isn't a common thing for everybody. So yes I did have to conquer my fear of heights too. I did it by climbing a Railway bridge in 3 attempts (3 visits). I wasn't wearing any safety equipment which really pushed my fears out of the way.

Take a look of that sketchy thing... Yes it's still very well active for freights (specially when climbing the bridge with one passing over you for a solid 2 minutes, shaking everything you touch).

411930.jpg (138 kb, 800x533)
click to view






Learn by doing

Be careful with that; it's not uncommon for gravel ballast, rocks, coal, RR Spikes, etc to go flying when a train passes. Unfortunately on a RR bridge under it is usually the only option if a train is coming.
Moving trains are dangerous in more ways than one.

There are many inactive lines though, and these are safer choices. Rotten timber can be an issue on inactive lines; be careful what you walk on!




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Dee Ashley 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 51 on 10/2/2017 7:56 AM >
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Posted by blackhawk


Learn by doing

Be careful with that; it's not uncommon for gravel ballast, rocks, coal, RR Spikes, etc to go flying when a train passes. Unfortunately on a RR bridge under it is usually the only option if a train is coming.
Moving trains are dangerous in more ways than one.

There are many inactive lines though, and these are safer choices. Rotten timber can be an issue on inactive lines; be careful what you walk on!


Most people have no idea:
http://www.post-ga...ories/200908160126

"But on average, locomotive operators are involved in three fatalities over the course of a career."

https://www.ble-t....dline.asp?id=10929

It's terrifying and tragic. You couldn't pay me enough.




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Corvid 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 52 on 11/9/2017 9:31 PM >
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There's a comfort level you have to overcome if you've not got an actual fear of heights... highest tower I've been up was 110m (360 feet). It's really not that scary when there's a cage round the ladder, but this one didn't have one! You just have to ignore your mind saying "if you fall, you die", and remember that our ancestors swung through trees with ease... you can die falling down a flight of stairs, but we're comfortable enough to use them daily. Careful climbing and good technique means you're pretty damn safe. That said, pure and simple heights at the top of a building is another matter entirely! Anyone with vertigo can climb stairs, but looking over the edge must still be a bit much!




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blackhawk 


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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 53 on 11/9/2017 11:02 PM >
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Posted by Corvid
There's a comfort level you have to overcome if you've not got an actual fear of heights... highest tower I've been up was 110m (360 feet). It's really not that scary when there's a cage round the ladder, but this one didn't have one! You just have to ignore your mind saying "if you fall, you die", and remember that our ancestors swung through trees with ease... you can die falling down a flight of stairs, but we're comfortable enough to use them daily. Careful climbing and good technique means you're pretty damn safe. That said, pure and simple heights at the top of a building is another matter entirely! Anyone with vertigo can climb stairs, but looking over the edge must still be a bit much!


These are a blast and a lot of fun
Uncaged ladders are easier to climb if you do it right by grasping the outside of the ladder rather than the rungs to climb or descent.
Swing slightly side to side to keep a more ergonomic/balanced form, enhance hand grip and conserve energy.
When resting or if in distress interlock a leg behind the knee on a rung.
Falling in a caged ladder is anything but safe.



[last edit 11/9/2017 11:03 PM by blackhawk - edited 1 times]

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Re: Conquering Your Fear of Heights
< Reply # 54 on 11/10/2017 5:24 AM >
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Ever since I was a child I've been deathly afraid of heights.




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