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UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Flat photo help (Viewed 1658 times)
MeesterPanda 


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Flat photo help
< on 11/2/2015 1:32 AM >
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Sooo... I'm still using my sad little point and shoot.

Basically, I was looking through some old photos, and I was this and noticed how flat and squishy the whole thing feels. The building just sinks into the background, and I'm not sure how to counteract that. Is there anything I can do to edit it, or is it a case of compositional/technical brain fart?
375931.jpg (88 kb, 366x500)
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Any help is greatly appreciated!




Deuterium 


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Re: Flat photo help
< Reply # 1 on 11/2/2015 3:37 AM >
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Do you like this a bit better? 1.




Play around with your "+/-" setting on your camera to get around auto-exposure decision. Just about every P&S camera has it.

Take one starting at -2 and work your way up one whole value at a time all the way to +2 on a tripod to get familiar with what it does.




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Re: Flat photo help
< Reply # 2 on 11/2/2015 10:46 PM >
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As above..
Unless you're looking at separating the subject from background like this ?

1.






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tiftastic 


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Re: Flat photo help
< Reply # 3 on 11/11/2015 12:32 AM >
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I like the depth of field change, but it looks unnatural - reminds me of a tilt-shift image.

I would recommend playing around with darkening your blacks and desaturating the background just a touch

Posted by Snow7
As above..
Unless you're looking at separating the subject from background like this ?

1.
375998.jpg (53 kb, 366x500)
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tiffers 


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Re: Flat photo help
< Reply # 4 on 12/29/2015 6:33 PM >
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It sinks into the background because you have a busy building and a busy background. I would advise a different angle...potentially lower, so the top of the building is a bit higher. Though, that may be pointless now as you're not still there.




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DJ Craig 

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Re: Flat photo help
< Reply # 5 on 12/31/2015 10:43 PM >
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There are three main ways that our brain perceives depth in a 2D medium such as a photo:
1. Perspective
2. Lighting
3. Depth of field / focus

Perspective: If you've ever taken a drawing class, think of 2-point and 3-point perspective. Perspective is created by the angle. This photo has some very limited 3-point perspective to it. Being closer to the subject would increase that. Of course that might not be possible, depending on the layout of the place.

Lighting: Our brain uses shadows to perceive depth. Because of the overcast lighting, there are no shadows, which makes it look flat. Same reason photos taken using a built-in camera flash tend to look flat.

Depth of field: This is probably the easiest one to fix in this case. The clutter in the background is making the background jump out at us. The more you can get that background to blur out the better. This can be achieved by using a wider aperture, or a higher focal length on your lens. Or you can do it very carefully in Photoshop, if you know what you're doing. If you really want to get fancy with depth of field stuff, do some research about "bokeh".


As an afterthought, I'll add that there is also atmospheric perspective. Imagine if this photo was taken on a slightly foggy day. The background might still be visible, but would be faded due to the fog, which would affect the foreground to a much lesser degree, which will imply depth.

Hope that helps!




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yokes 


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Re: Flat photo help
< Reply # 6 on 1/1/2016 3:40 PM >
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What was the focal length of the lens? If it is a longer lens, it will compress the foreground and background normally, flattening things.




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Archer 


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Re: Flat photo help
< Reply # 7 on 1/3/2016 12:04 AM >
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Posted by tiffers
It sinks into the background because you have a busy building and a busy background. I would advise a different angle...potentially lower, so the top of the building is a bit higher. Though, that may be pointless now as you're not still there.


^ This. The peak on your subject is at roughly the same height as the background, which hurts. Your eyes generally follow lines - if the subject tower was significantly above the background, that distinct break in the background line would draw attention.


Posted by yokes
What was the focal length of the lens? If it is a longer lens, it will compress the foreground and background normally, flattening things.


^ Also this.





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UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Flat photo help (Viewed 1658 times)


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