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UER Forum > Canada: Other > Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success (Viewed 10120 times)
kramer 


Location: Cole Harbour
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Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< on 7/14/2015 7:30 AM >
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I've posted in other recent threads about my interest in abandoned mine sites in Nova Scotia. I had a plan to venture out and hunt for good sites whenever I got a chance. Well that chance finally came this past weekend.

My hope has been to find GOOD "walkable" mines that go deep underground, and preferably have no tampering by the Nova Scotia government.

I started in Folly Mountain (near Truro & Debert) in Nova Scotia.

Well with this first scouting attempt, I think I ended up finding what could become a great site, with both criteria intact. One of those walkable sites. Something so remote and hidden, that the province never dealt with it. Well ding ding ding - I found one. Hopefully not the last.

The only problem was, I wasn't completely prepared for what I found this trip. Next time I visit, I know I have to deal with some water and some rudimentary climbing.

I ended up making a video, which I put up on YouTube:
https://www.youtub...atch?v=MZyimavm3jM

Now some may think "you're going to to back and try to explore that shit? Mines are f*cking dangerous !!" Well, logically yes. Sometimes yes. But I'm an extremely cautious and logical person - and I'd stop dead in my tracks if ANYTHING was dinging my radar for the slightest amount of trouble. To me, it comes down to the reality that these mines are 100 years old, solid rock, and if they haven't caved-in after 100 years, they're not going to do it precisely on the day I might be inside. Mines don't think. The odds of a collapse are beyond lottery odds - to happen on the hour that you may be inside. I've played this out over and over in my head, and I just can't worry about that part. What I DO worry about is safety - when it comes to access, climbing, escape, etc. I would never attempt anything without guarantees I was going home that evening. You'll see in the video - there were simply impassible or unaccessible points where I could not proceed any further. Not this time. So I just accepted that and gave up those hopes on that trip. Next time I'll know what I need. Hell, I didn't even think I was going to find anything as compelling as I did. I have maps with dozens more sites to scout at later dates - who knows what I might find.

As for this location, I can confirm two major (explorable) openings. One involves some water (which I hope the tunnel rises higher further down, so the water eventually ends - but I couldn't see down that far). There is also a chance the tunnel slopes downward - meaning the water eventually just reaches the ceiling and it's impassible. If the tunnel is level, it means the water will be present always - thus a nuisance, and that super sucks. I won't be going far in a half-filled tunnel. Just don't like the feeling.

The shaft opening (second spot at the same location) looks VERY promising - as there seemed to be no water involved. However, the catch-22 was accessibility. So I'll know next time when I'm standing at the bottom and can actually see what's going on with the tunnels heading off in each direction.

Anyway, the day was more fruitful that I had expected. Never thought there were things like that still hidden in Nova Scotia forests. But it's not all gravy - about 8 other GPS waypoints I checked in the Folly Mountain area were absolute crap. I hiked for hours in total to get to all those. All time wasted, but you never know until you check.

By the way - if I hadn't mentioned before, you can prospect for potential sites on this handy government database web app linked below. If you turn on the right parameters, and learn how to navigate the zoom, and Info tools - you can really get good at finding potential hits.


http://www.library...es-interactive-map


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SouthPaw 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 1 on 7/14/2015 4:05 PM >
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Sounds pretty cool, and I look forward to seeing the results.
My only suggestion would be to definitely not do this alone. Caving is definitely a multi-person operation for safety reasons.




tbeckerson 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 2 on 7/17/2015 12:00 AM >
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Very nice! I'm glad this explore worked out for you.

However, I have to agree with SouthPaw about bringing someone with you. Cautious or not, a place like that could easily become your tomb.




symph 


Location: Halifax NS
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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 3 on 7/20/2015 12:56 PM >
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Awesome find! It's great to see someone come into the community that's geared towards mines and caves, as we're lacking explore-time in those areas. We do have a lot of mines out here, especially in Cape Breton if you ever happen to find yourself out there.

I also second what SouthPaw said: Bring a friend. However, I will also recommend that you carry a toxic gas/oxygen sensor with you when you're spelunking. Many of our mine systems alternate entrances and/or air shafts have been partially flooded or completely buried which means that toxic gasses and CO2 pockets can collect in portions of the mines. So remember, safety first. Because that would be a terrible place to have something go majorly wrong. Another great safety precaution is to bring chalk to mark your exit route as you go deeper, because a GPS can always fail, and it can lead to fatal results.



[last edit 7/20/2015 1:02 PM by symph - edited 1 times]

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Historian124 


Location: South Shore NS
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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 4 on 7/28/2015 2:08 AM >
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I did work for Lands and Forest putting up Danger signs around the mine sites in and around that area. The Acadia Iron Mine Complex were the largest Iron Mine workings of their time in Canada. The Acadia Iron Mine Ironworks & Pipe Shop Was Located in Londonderry, NS and the tunnels stretched from Lornevale through the Cobequid Mountains to Londonderry through to East Folly Mountain a total distance of about 10kms in a straight line. There are hundreds of Adits, Shafts, Stopes, open stopes, Drifts, Portals etc. All of witch are documented on DNR's Website. However EXTREME CAUTION should be used while walking in these areas as if you fall into one of these holes the chances of you getting out is slim to none. The deepest shaft i came across while hiking out there was over 450 feet straight down it was like a 12x12 sinkhole into the abyss.
Entry into these mines is considered a death wish as most of the portals ( The surface entrance to a tunnel or adit) are flooded and have shafts that go straight down hundreds of feet and if you happen to be wearing hip waders in an adit and are up to your waist in water and dont see a shaft guess where your going... straight to the bottom of the water filled shaft and if it just so happens you are wearing a life jacket well thats going to do nothing if your wearing hip waders be like a buoy on the end of an anchor and you are going to drown. I Cant Stress the DANGER enough. Most of the Mines dont have air either so u might get in to the adit a couple hundred feet and suffocate or run into a methane pocket in with case u are dead either way. I do admit its fun to go investigate and document these mines but DO NOT ENTER them it might be the last thing you do.




kramer 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 5 on 7/28/2015 8:59 PM >
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I appreciate the warnings and scary spookage, and I understand the common fears that come along with old mines. But all the kinds of scares you mention only fortify the caution & safety that I would impose on myself - literally step by step, judged moment to moment. I certainly do not have a death wish, and have logically played out all decisions in my head. No mine is worth getting super risky for. So if anything of even the slightest spook came up, it's stop and turn back.

I won't be going alone. That's a given now. We'll be dozens of feet apart, and I've even considered tethers between us.

Deep water-filled drifts/adits are NOT ideal - and I don't want to deal with them at all, truthfully. Water to the ankles - OK. I don't care about puddles or small ponding. Those are going to be in Nova Scotian mines anywhere. Every adit I've walked has had some kind of water involved. It's all a matter of degree.

When it comes to the two drifts at the bottom of the Folly Mountain slope, the water is going to be judged once I'm standing in it. I've got to see the true depth of what I'm dealing with - and how far it goes.

As for walking off a winze that I don't see - won't happen. I'll be doing complete illumination of the crystal-clear water BEFORE it is walked into. Gentle, slow walking. There is no rush. We'll all be 20+ feet apart, and I plan to tether just to be uber-safe (allows for drag-back).

All the spooks of deadly air pockets and bad air are overblown - I'm just going to be up front and say it. I've looked into this and had extensive conversations with mine explorers in the USA that do 50X the exploration that I could ever hope to do. Check out some of the channels on YouTube dedicated to mine exploration - and you'll be amazed at these guys going underground for 4 to 5 hours at a time, climbing down slopes and visiting 1-5 levels, with miles of drifts each. Way way way more than I'd ever dare to do. The chances of threatening air are lottery odds - and these guys have told me it never comes up in their hundreds of hours of exploration. We're talking unmoving air miles underground for them. Regardless, just go to the comments sections of these videos, and you'll see the arguments over exactly the points you brought up. There are even Mine Warning videos out there, where the opposite happens in the comments - the fearmongering in those videos is beat to death by mine explorers. So opinions are all over the place. I can only go by what I see (with my own eyes) guys accomplishing in the most precarious and extensive looking mines, for hours per visit, on video - with calm and interesting commentary - and make up my own mind. Yes there are possible dangers. Those mines were filled with hundreds of people, every day, for years too.

I've walked the Saint Mary's River Lead Mine adit years ago - it took an hour to get to the end, and an hour to get back. Slowly, carefully. There was never a hint of bad air, in fact the air felt fresh, clean, and normal. I know. I know. One can never tell. All I'm saying is, baby steps. The moment of dizzyness, faintness, anything... it's speak up, and everybody retreat.

I'm hoping the drifts at Folly Mountain don't involve water for much of a distance. I can only know once I stand in the water and can look directly down each drift in both directions, and light them up. My hope is that the water doesn't go far, and the drifts rise up and out of the water level. We shall see.

If you worked on the Folly Mountain sites, you probably know that 90% of them have been dealt with by the province. I got only 2 untouched openings out of 25 that I visited that day. Everything up there is pretty much buried, backfilled, and plugged. These 450 foot shafts you saw, existed when? What year? Because the govt has been actively attacking openings since about 2008. I am aware of how awesome the Acadia iron works were back in their day (thus the picking of the area to try first). But I don't think there is much left as you may think. I still have several dozen GPS spots to visit up there, but if I find even one or two more actual untouched openings, I'd be surprised.

In closing, I don't want to appear that I am mocking or waving off your warnings or concerns. I just think we're in two totally different camps when it comes to degree of fear/danger and the logic/beliefs surrounding those situations. I probably know 100 people who wouldn't walk into a mine if you paid them to do so. Not only because of apathy and disinterest, but by that natural default fear of danger.

I'm an UE. So be it. We all have our limits and thresholds.





kramer 


Location: Cole Harbour
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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 6 on 7/28/2015 9:10 PM >
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Just as point of reference for everybody... you want to see "extreme" ? Then check out what these guys accomplished:

PART ONE
https://www.youtub...atch?v=RVhP_afEaQ8

Then didn't get far on the first visit. BUT... Then they came back prepared (incredible explore):

PART TWO
https://www.youtub...atch?v=EG4oUFA1N-0





Historian124 


Location: South Shore NS
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Historian

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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 7 on 7/29/2015 2:20 AM >
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I started documenting the mines in 2010. Every location is different. Ive been to some mines in the Acadia Iron Mine District and upon inspecting and documenting their location, had a rock fall happen a few hundred feet in front of me in the mine. Scary stuff. But im not trying to scare you im just trying to better educate you. I would hate to see anything happen to you or the next guy. If you want to walk into a mine you go right ahead but be warned if something does go wrong and a cave-in does occur and you are not killed in the process the chances of you surviving or being rescued is slim. You just sit down and talk with a DNR geologist for an hour you be surprised the helpful information you can gather. Take a oxygen sensor with you so u can measure the oxygen level but if u are anything like most people you will say "ahh i don need an oxygen sensor everything will be fine, the chances of something happening while im there are slim" but that my friend is a recipe for disaster. Anyway you've been warned. Happy exploring.





Historian124 


Location: South Shore NS
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Historian

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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 8 on 7/29/2015 2:40 AM >
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the other thing you got to be cautious about is the Acadia Iron Mines have alot of crates of left over TNT or dynamite and in the old days they used nitroglycerin and sawdust wrapped in paper to make their sticks of dynamite. If you should ever find stick or a crate DO NOT TOUCH OR DISTURB IT IN ANY WAY, one little bump and it could explode as the sawdust will break down over time and the nitroglycerin will become ever more unstable. Ive came across eight boxes between 2010 and 2013.




kramer 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 9 on 7/29/2015 3:52 AM >
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Posted by Historian124
I started documenting the mines in 2010.


Not to nitpick or argue, but I need to start asking some credential questions since you have strongly doubled-down on what now comes across as a daddy threatening a son. I don't know you. Maybe that wasn't your intention. "You've been warned - happy exploring" is not only oxymoronic, but comes across as snide and trying to put the fear of god into us.

The govt database shows the Folly Mountain region (Acadia district) to have been last visited in the 1994-1998 timeframe. These activities in 2010 that you mention... were these personal, or official documentings? If official, then why isn't the data in the 2013 dump of the database?

Just trying to get the scope / purpose of your experiences there.


Posted by Historian124Ive been to some mines in the Acadia Iron Mine District and upon inspecting and documenting their location, had a rock fall happen a few hundred feet in front of me in the mine. Scary stuff.


Maybe the way you describe this is ambigious, but are you saying that you had a rock fall happen in "some mines"... like more than once? You say "some" and "their" meaning more than one. Or did a rock fall happen in only one of the "some" ?? I'm assuming the latter.

Look, as far as I'm concerned, you could park a lawn chair at the entrance of any mine, lay a sensor strip the whole length of the mine, and sit and wait... and you'd be decades waiting for a collapse. Hell, most of these mines are already 100 years old. As I've mentioned in other posts, mines don't think. The odds of being in one and a collapse happening during the one hour (out of hundreds of thousands of hours) that you happen to be in there... well, it's a common mistake of human thinking. That feeling that when you're standing in there, that something has changed... it knows you're there... and it's waiting to trap you... it's simply not true. The myth of "inward pressure" is also not true. A mountain with a drift through it is like a cinderblock of concrete the size of an 18-wheeler, with a 1-inch hole drilled through it. The load forces are 99.9999% carried by the surrounding rock. It's what made mines possible. It's not the same as deep ocean forces - as water is liquid. Mountains are a solid structure, and behave like a giant load-bearing chunk. It's why your house's walls aren't being forced inward/downward and won't collapse in on you. Timbering in mines was to assist in crumbling ceilings - not holding the ceiling UP. If timbering was to support the ceiling (weight) of the mountain above, they would have been futile. You can't put an 8x8 beam under 1,000,000 tons. Which is precisely why timbering was never that.

So this rock fall... was it a collapse / seal-off of the tunnel ? Or did some of the ceiling crumble? Big difference. Even still, with the "waiting on a lawn chair" scenario... I still believe (well.. I know) that you'd be waiting months, if not years, just for a crumble-fall. To be standing under one, in the precise spot, when it happens... lottery winner. (or technically loser I guess).


Posted by Historian124But im not trying to scare you im just trying to better educate you.


Could've fooled me. Your words are freaking scary. Like they'd spook most people to run away from a mine screaming. I do believe that is your intention. To freak me out to the point I just don't go back. It's the safe position, and I appreciate that. Nothing bad can come from your position.

Absolute safety is not doing any exploration, period. UE dead. For everybody.

What I'm trying to garner, and what I'd like to hear, is pro-exploration discussions for mines, with the unlikely-but-present risks acknowledged, but maximization of the success of returning home happy and safely.

In other words, pooping on the parade is just coming across as negative. While I hear you loud and clear, it's nothing I've not heard or read a million times while exploring the possibility of NS mine hunting, for months in advance before actually going out to do it. I've weighed every bit of logic & reasoning, the doom-sayers and the "nothing to worry about" crowds.

All I know is guys do very well, for hours, miles of walking, sometimes 7 levels deep (700+ feet down inclined shafts), in scraggy sandy-rocked desert-based mines where the walls crumble when you grab them.

Nova Scotian rock is solid, granite-like consistency. Especially in those mountains. It was partially why they were so rich in iron ore.


Posted by Historian124If you want to walk into a mine you go right ahead but be warned if something does go wrong and a cave-in does occur and you are not killed in the process the chances of you surviving or being rescued is slim.


I don't know how to respond to this except "no shit, sherlock" and it would sound awfully rude in saying so. But that's why I'm trying to implore that I am aware of all the spooks and risks you mention... how do I express this better...

I'm going to be exploring DESPITE those risks. Does that make sense?

Of course "I've been warned" and "if something does go wrong" then yes.. it's all on my head. I'll be a dead duck, of my own making. But that is the risk tradeoff I am willing to make. The same risk tradeoff we make when boarding an aircraft, or getting in our car every day, or whatever. One may say the chance of getting in a car crash is higher than being in a mine that happens to collapse, or has a trait that successfully kills you. Life is odds.

I'm just not going to preach people away from crumbling buildings, or any degree of UE, because we all know the risks we are taking on.

My position is mines pose no more/less risk than other UE. You likely disagree.



Posted by Historian124Take a oxygen sensor with you so u can measure the oxygen level but if u are anything like most people you will say "ahh i don need an oxygen sensor everything will be fine"



This oxygen sensor thing is thrown around thousands of times it seems in comments I read everywhere. It screams of layman jargon. Why? Because if you knew what you were recommending, you'd know what an oxygen sensor is and how it works.

You do realize a sensor system of such type is thousands of dollars, right? But the sticking point is their sensor itself - which has to be changed almost monthly (at hundreds of dollars a pop) and kept calibrated by a well-trained technician. They are not something any UE would own, or could maintain. They aren't around for open rental (and if they were, could you count on their calibration and sensor freshness?). It's one of those things that's a nice (almost automatically assumed) sentiment... but reality is a whole different thing.

No mine explorer is going to have oxygen sense equipment. It's out of reach. Even the "pro" mine explorers that walk hundreds of mines and have hundreds of miles underground on their belts... have not had the luxury of such equipment.

Yes, the thinking it's not needed MAY get me killed. MAY. But again, it's lottery odds. Russian roulette with a revolver that holds 100,000 bullets, but only one bullet is inserted... spin that chamber... I WOULD pull the trigger. That's what I'm trying to tell you.

Your position is to simply not play that roulette at all.

So be it. We disagree.


I appreciate the concern and the cautions. I'm not a silly teenager looking for kicks, but a 40+ year old with a fairly tuned brain. Your view isn't unlike probably 99% of my own friends... but that's what differentiates the UE, in my opinion. None of them see a stitch of beauty, intrigue, or adventure in ANYTHING we would discuss on here. Mines or otherwise. So if I come across as defiant to strict warnings, it's not that I don't respect you as a fellow UE... it's more that I just don't need my hand held. If that makes sense. I don't think your feedback is out of line. It has it's place on here. We all want to be safe and live. But I have to tell you I will not be spooked out of continuing with the mines. In fact, I have a ton of sites left, with others on here connecting with me interested on trying out some scouting.

You have to concede that dying on the highway on the WAY to the scouting sites is hundreds of times (if not thousands of times) more likely than dying in a mine drift.

Not that I'm trying to "win" some kind of argument. Just trying to keep it logical.





Historian124 


Location: South Shore NS
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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 10 on 7/30/2015 4:45 AM >
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I was under the impression you was a teenager that didn't take the dangerous part of it into consideration, not a sarcastic middle age man. My bad. I wont make that mistake again. But you know, and this is the last im going to say about this... I know you are a 40 plus year old man and it is your life and decisions and all, but you got to think of the Drägermen that if something does go wrong will be climbing through rock and rubble to get your ass out alive. Probably didn't think about that. anyway

I was going to upload the old mine reports but i think i will pass i dont want to have this turning into a full fledged bitching match its too much drama for me. Do what you like man if i had of known u was 40 years old i would have just kept my mouth closed. Enjoy the Urban Exploring Mine Style.



[last edit 7/30/2015 5:24 AM by Historian124 - edited 3 times]

Darkzero 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 11 on 7/31/2015 2:53 AM >
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Great stuff here. Keep up the good work. I just got done a mine vacation in BC. and now going to get the keys to my new home in NS (by Halifax)this week. I'm no expert and have no death wish but if you want to explore old mines count me in. I also got the gear to go up and down those cliffs.

I will post my mine pics in the next week or so. I tried a few different lighting tricks so excited to see what I got.




kramer 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 12 on 7/31/2015 5:19 AM >
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and just so everybody knows, Historian and I have been private-messaging each other, outside this forum thread... and we've pretty much buried the hatchet now.

All good vibes, peace and love, and all that shit. No more drama.

Sorry to all that had their popcorn out. It's all good now.




Historian124 


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Historian

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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 13 on 8/4/2015 5:07 AM >
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Common' we are talking about mining here! We didn't "bury the hatchet"... We buried the pick-axe and back-filled the portal! We are all good!




kramer 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 14 on 8/8/2015 6:20 PM >
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UPDATE

Went back for a second crack at the Folly Mountain cave/stope entrance. This time took a dingy boat to travel on the water. Historian124 came along with me.

Special thanks to Darkzero for the dingy idea:



Darkzero in his dingy (Alberta):




Me in my dingy (Folly Mountain):





Travelling watery adits in this fashion makes it easy. It's like being a ghost floating on a magic carpet. No oars required... you simply push lightly on the walls or ceiling. You can really cruise through there, even faster than walking. One shove and you can go 20 feet at a time. Quickly.




Anyway, here is what we found:

Just to give everybody a better understanding of the Folly Mountain site, here is a rudimentary drawing. Giant cave/open-stope that leads down to two portals going off in two directions:

Diagram







LEFT PORTAL:

The adit that went to the left goes about 150 feet (with a few bends & turns) and then ends. The water in that section is about 2.5 feet deep the whole way. At the end, there appears to be a small winze that goes up to possibly another area. But it's only big enough for 1 person to crawl through. I never got out of the boat. Just a little too cramped at the end, with the ceiling getting low.



RIGHT PORTAL:

The adit on this side, frankly, goes on "forever". I never got to the end. I'd say I got 600-700 feet and turned around in a big room, and went back. The feeling of isolation just got the best of me. Historian124 always waited back at the portal(s) for safety.

The water starts at about 2.5 feet deep, but continually gets lower the further you go. This proves my hope that these adits were cut on a slight "uphill" inclination, as always to drain water toward the portal. By the time I got to the furthest point where I turned around, the water was barely 6 inches under my dingy. There is going to be a point further in, where one can simply get out of the boat and walk the rest on foot. Further exploration is required here, and there needs to be more than one person.

The adit went through a couple small stopes, but where I turned around it was a decently large stoped-out area about 40x40 feet, with a 20 foot domed ceiling.





CONCLUSION:

Didn't really worry about taking pictures or video on this trip. That needs to be done when it's several of us going in, in several dingys, and there's lots of lights and commentary to be had. In other words, the trip that reaches the end will be the one that is filmed. So no video this time.

"Still needs further study" would be the conclusion of this visit, for this Folly Mountain site, for now.





Darkzero 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 15 on 8/14/2015 12:13 AM >
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Posted by kramer
UPDATE

Went back for a second crack at the Folly Mountain cave/stope entrance. This time took a dingy boat to travel on the water. Historian124 came along with me.

Special thanks to Darkzero for the dingy idea:



Darkzero in his dingy (Alberta):

369627.jpg (87 kb, 800x600)
click to view



Awesome Stuff. I'm not a big fan of the dingy but a good way in getting into a few places other wise you could not go to. I've been in water with my hip wadders (chest deep). I was not a fan of that and only traveled about 5 feet before I turned back. The power of the water was unreal.





Historian124 


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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 16 on 8/15/2015 4:45 AM >
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Posted by Darkzero

Awesome Stuff. I'm not a big fan of the dingy but a good way in getting into a few places other wise you could not go to. I've been in water with my hip wadders (chest deep). I was not a fan of that and only traveled about 5 feet before I turned back.
The power of the water was unreal.




The water had power? How hydro-electric is that!?




Darkzero 


Location: Nova Scotia
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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 17 on 8/15/2015 11:26 PM >
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Posted by Historian124
Posted by Darkzero

Awesome Stuff. I'm not a big fan of the dingy but a good way in getting into a few places other wise you could not go to. I've been in water with my hip wadders (chest deep). I was not a fan of that and only traveled about 5 feet before I turned back.

The water had power? How hydro-electric is that!?


The force of the water? No Power, sorry.





Historian124 


Location: South Shore NS
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Historian

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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 18 on 8/16/2015 12:31 AM >
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Ah you had me fooled.




Jonsered 


Location: Back in New Mexico where I belong
Gender: Male
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Dressed for a scarecrow ball.........

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Re: Nova Scotia ABANDONED MINE Scouting Success
< Reply # 19 on 8/16/2015 6:02 PM >
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Posted on Forum: UER Forum
All legit concerns, and none of them PREVENT access. Yep, mines can be bad news, but with a little care and some basic equipment, its about as much fun as you can have exploring. Get your shit straightened out, take a level headed buddy and do it.

I will revisit one particular point: old iron mines have bad air OFTEN. the rust process explains that. Be cool, have fun, and I look forward to the pics.




I have changed my personal exploring ethics code. From now on it will be: "Take only aimed shots, leave only hobo corpses." Copper scrappers, meth heads and homeless beware. The Jonsered cometh among you, bringing fear and dread.

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