forums
new posts
donate
UER Store
events
location db
db map
search
members
faq
terms of service
privacy policy
register
login




UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial (Viewed 1812 times)
alexcell33 


Location: Long Island NY
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes




 |  | 
Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< on 7/15/2014 3:05 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Hello! Im looking to get some criticism on some of my better shots. Im fairly new to photography, but don't be afraid to be honest!
1.



2.


3.


4.


5.


6.


7.


8.


9.


10.




shadowedsmile 


Location: Northwestern Ontario
Gender: Female
Total Likes: 146 likes


mines always on the mind

 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 1 on 7/15/2014 3:14 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Your straight lines in the majority of the photos are a good start! Not that all photos ever have to be straight - but you seem to have caught onto the shots where it's super important. Keep it up!




"Adventure is the respectful pursuit of trouble." - Expedition Overland
fornaz 


Location: Montreal
Total Likes: 18 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 2 on 7/15/2014 3:48 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
As a starter, let me congratulate you on not blowing your whites. Windows are hard not to overexpose when you're in a dark building, I personally usually fail miserably to get two shots good for composite imaging with my shit tripod, even when I'm paying attention, so for a 'new photographer' you're showing promise.

You do however get some dark rooms there, the very opposite of blown windows, and though it can be a nice effect, it's also sad when you don't get the full dynamism of a human eye. It's more easily fixed, thankfully, if you don't mind the added noise (some cameras produce beautiful noise... others not so much), the best solution is still to shoot multiple images with a tipod.

Compositionwise, shadowedsmile already talked about your straightlines, so I won't add anymore to that, I'd say you have a good eye. The only thing I would pay attention to is the roof-floor framing. In picture #5 for example, I would have framed the windows dead-centre. You can easily crop if you fuck up while shooting, so it's no biggie, but especially when starting I find it's a good idea to stick to either centering or the rule of third. I know it's been said and debated many times how cliché it can get, but I've always felt there's a reason it's so widely used, even unknowingly.

I hope this helps! Keep it up.




alexcell33 


Location: Long Island NY
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 3 on 7/15/2014 3:49 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by shadowedsmile
Your straight lines in the majority of the photos are a good start! Not that all photos ever have to be straight - but you seem to have caught onto the shots where it's super important. Keep it up!


Hey shadowedsmile!

Thanks for the advice! Ive been trying to pay more attention to my composition.

Alex




alexcell33 


Location: Long Island NY
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 4 on 7/15/2014 3:58 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by fornaz
As a starter, let me congratulate you on not blowing your whites. Windows are hard not to overexpose when you're in a dark building, I personally usually fail miserably to get two shots good for composite imaging with my shit tripod, even when I'm paying attention, so for a 'new photographer' you're showing promise.

You do however get some dark rooms there, the very opposite of blown windows, and though it can be a nice effect, it's also sad when you don't get the full dynamism of a human eye. It's more easily fixed, thankfully, if you don't mind the added noise (some cameras produce beautiful noise... others not so much), the best solution is still to shoot multiple images with a tipod.

Compositionwise, shadowedsmile already talked about your straightlines, so I won't add anymore to that, I'd say you have a good eye. The only thing I would pay attention to is the roof-floor framing. In picture #5 for example, I would have framed the windows dead-centre. You can easily crop if you fuck up while shooting, so it's no biggie, but especially when starting I find it's a good idea to stick to either centering or the rule of third. I know it's been said and debated many times how cliché it can get, but I've always felt there's a reason it's so widely used, even unknowingly.

I hope this helps! Keep it up.


Hey fornaz!
Some great advice here! The darkness in some of the pictures is something I actually found pretty cool looking. I do see what your saying about making the photos more faithful to the human eye, and I did take multiple shots with a tripod and the lighter ones didn't look as good to me haha maybe I just have a weird taste. Ill definitely try some of your composition tips in the future and post them up!

Alex




fornaz 


Location: Montreal
Total Likes: 18 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 5 on 7/15/2014 12:47 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by alexcell33
I do see what your saying about making the photos more faithful to the human eye, and I did take multiple shots with a tripod and the lighter ones didn't look as good to me haha maybe I just have a weird taste.


Sorry I should have explained better, I meant taking multiple exposures and stitching the photos together in photoshop. Something of an HDR, if you will, since you're trying to recreate high dynamic range of the human eye. There's a sort of contrast if you take i.e. picture 6 where in person you could probably see much of the inside of that room, it did not appear so dark. Cameras are bad at capturing the full range of exposures, which is why sometimes you can stitch togetehr a few pictures to recreate how you could really see it. Then again, as you said, it can look pretty cool. I just personally find it gets old when all the photos look like that in a set.




Adv.Pack 


Location: Connecticut
Total Likes: 262 likes


Adventure Pack

 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 6 on 7/15/2014 6:55 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
with the exception of #1, I would personally just let the highlights blow out in order to get more proper exposure inside.
Don't worry too much about keeping your window highlights in check unless there is something interesting/ beneficial outside.




https://www.instagram.com/chris.kiely/
ttp://www.flickr.com/photos/adv_/
alexcell33 


Location: Long Island NY
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 7 on 7/15/2014 7:24 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by fornaz


Sorry I should have explained better, I meant taking multiple exposures and stitching the photos together in photoshop. Something of an HDR, if you will, since you're trying to recreate high dynamic range of the human eye. There's a sort of contrast if you take i.e. picture 6 where in person you could probably see much of the inside of that room, it did not appear so dark. Cameras are bad at capturing the full range of exposures, which is why sometimes you can stitch togetehr a few pictures to recreate how you could really see it. Then again, as you said, it can look pretty cool. I just personally find it gets old when all the photos look like that in a set.


Ahh I get what your saying. I never heard of combining pictures I guess its time to learn some new tricks! Thanks for the help.




alexcell33 


Location: Long Island NY
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 8 on 7/15/2014 7:27 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by Adv.Pack
with the exception of #1, I would personally just let the highlights blow out in order to get more proper exposure inside.
Don't worry too much about keeping your window highlights in check unless there is something interesting/ beneficial outside.


Thanks! I'm going to try this next time I'm shooting and ill post the pics up! I knew they looked a little dark...




RedBush 


Location: Twin Cities, MN
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 13 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 9 on 7/21/2014 9:56 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by fornaz
As a starter, let me congratulate you on not blowing your whites. Windows are hard not to overexpose when you're in a dark building, I personally usually fail miserably to get two shots good for composite imaging with my shit tripod, even when I'm paying attention, so for a 'new photographer' you're showing promise.


I've got to second this. I'm still pretty new at the photography thing, myself, and your windows look worlds better than anything I've been able to manage. Have these images undergone any editing at all, or are they right out of the camera? I know programs like Lightbox allow you to composite multiple shots that show both the highlights and the lowlights, so if you're doing any tweaks/touchups, that may be worth looking into.

As for framing, they're generally looking pretty good. I'd just say watch your edges and what you're cutting off, like in #8 where we don't get the full frame of the door. Otherwise, not bad!




alexcell33 


Location: Long Island NY
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 19 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 10 on 7/23/2014 7:34 PM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Posted by RedBush


I've got to second this. I'm still pretty new at the photography thing, myself, and your windows look worlds better than anything I've been able to manage. Have these images undergone any editing at all, or are they right out of the camera? I know programs like Lightbox allow you to composite multiple shots that show both the highlights and the lowlights, so if you're doing any tweaks/touchups, that may be worth looking into.

As for framing, they're generally looking pretty good. I'd just say watch your edges and what you're cutting off, like in #8 where we don't get the full frame of the door. Otherwise, not bad!


Hey thanks for the feedback. These images haven't had any editing done to them. Ill definitely look into Lightbox it sounds pretty cool!




forfun 


Total Likes: 4 likes




 |  | 
Re: Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial
< Reply # 11 on 10/20/2014 7:54 AM >
Reply with Quote
Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Quite of lot of people already noticed the exposure so I won't belabor the point.

I will echo one of the comments in regards to framing though. You can definitely take "tighter" pics. The clearest example is pic #5, where it lacks focus since it covers too big of an area. This makes it tough for the viewer to really hone in the most interesting aspect because there are so many things going on.

Try to distill what you really want stand out in each picture; get up to the object then snap. For example, if you want to emphasize the windows, stand closer for the shot. The other option is to use longer lens (maybe use a 80mm instead of a 50mm) - it should also improve your pics.

Hope you find it helpful



[last edit 10/20/2014 7:55 AM by forfun - edited 1 times]

UER Forum > UE Photo Critiques > Critique Welcome- Abandoned Mental Hosptial (Viewed 1812 times)


Add a poll to this thread



This thread is in a public category, and can't be made private.



All content and images copyright 2002-2020 UER.CA and respective creators. Graphical Design by Crossfire.
To contact webmaster, or click to email with problems or other questions about this site: UER CONTACT
View Terms of Service | View Privacy Policy | Server colocation provided by Beanfield
This page was generated for you in 109 milliseconds. Since June 23, 2002, a total of 602859075 pages have been generated.