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UER Forum > US: Southeast > Goodbye, TCI (Viewed 207 times)
Sheavy 


Location: Hoover, Alabama
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 473 likes




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Goodbye, TCI
< on 10/6/2019 12:20 AM >
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Posted on Forum: UER Forum
Thought it might be neat to make a little thread for everyone to share their pics of the TCI Ensley Steel Works since it's been demolished.





A Brief cliff notes history on the Ensley Steel Works, stolen pieced together from various wikis.



The town of Ensley was founded by the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company in 1886, and became the site for their largest plant, the Ensley Steel Works. The plant started in 1888 with 4 furnaces, with two more being added, one in 1900 and another in 1905. The Ensley Steel Works was the site of many firsts in the steel making industry in the United States, including the first plant to produce duplex steel, the first plant to utilize tilting open hearths, and the first blast furnaces in the Southeast region to produce basic iron on a large scale.


In October-November 1907 TCI Ensley Steel Works would be involved in the '1907 Bankers Panic', a panic stemming from a failed scheme to corner the market on stock involving the United Copper Company, resulting in bank and trust runs that spread through the country, and eventually causing the New York Stock Exchange to nearly collapse. The panic had mostly subsided by November, thanks in part to actions taken by several New York bankers including J.P. Morgan. However on Saturday Nov 2 one of the Stock Exchanges largest brokerage firms, Moore and Schley, was heavily in debt and about to collapse. Moore and Schley had been borrowing heavily using shares of TCI as collateral. On Monday, most banks would call the loans of Moore and Schley causing a liquidation of their stocks, which would cause TCI's shares to plummet, destroying Moore and Schley and causing another panic. This panic would end up being averted by J.P. Morgan's US Steel Company negotiating to buy TCI for 90 dollars a share, saving Moore and Schley and averting more trust runs. TCI would continue to operate as a subsidiary until 1952 when it became fully incorporated into US Steel.


In 1910 plans to create another plant and company town to the west of Ensley were started, beginning with the town of Corey, which would later be renamed to Fairfield. The works would be completed and opened in 1917.


The Ensley Works would continue on together with the Works in Fairfield throughout the next few decades, seeing expansion and growth during the two world wars. By 1962 however, many of the mines in the Birmingham area had closed, being replaced by cheaper alternatives from out of country. The Fairfield Works newer steel making processes had also by this time started to supplant the open hearths at the Ensley Works. These things eventually led to the slow consolidation of the Ensley and Fairfield works. This started in 1975 with the closing of the open hearths at Ensley. Throughout the latter half of the 70's and early 80's various sections of the Ensley Works would be halted and by 1984 all activity had ceased.






Historical photos stolen taken from various sites.



In operation.




















Abandoned from the 80s and 90s.

























https://www.moma.o...ction/works/116848




My shots, from 2010-2019, consists of various film types and digital.



1.
Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

2.
Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

3.
Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

4.
Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

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Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

38.
Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

39.
Untitled by Abandoned Alabama, on Flickr

Thanks for looking!



SHOW ME YOUR SHOTS



[last edit 10/6/2019 12:23 AM by Sheavy - edited 1 times]

Purveyor of Sinister Whimsy to the Wretched
blackhawk 

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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 1 on 10/6/2019 12:32 AM >
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Sad to see these giants die.
Maybe now the remaining ones will grow and thrive once again... USA #1




Just when I thought I was out... they pulled me back in.
Mr. Bitey 


Location: Milwaukee, WI
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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 2 on 10/6/2019 12:53 AM >
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Truly stunning. I feel compelled to extend my condolences - I am sorry for your loss. She was beautiful.




Give abandonment a reason for its sacrificial reclamation to nature. Love it. Remember it. Take a picture. Share it. Leave the decay to nature.

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EsseXploreR 


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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 3 on 10/6/2019 9:09 AM >
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Really wonderful stuff. Looks like it was a great place to wander around.




https://www.flickr...62837453@N07/sets/

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skatchkins 


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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 4 on 10/6/2019 3:21 PM >
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Wow what a great tribute spread. Thanks for the history and sweet old photos.
You documented her well. Great assortment of digital and film. They really captured the feel of the place from way over here.
Thanks




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leafloving4x4gal 


Location: Durham Region
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Someday is NOT a day of the week !

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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 5 on 10/6/2019 3:51 PM >
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Great set and photos. This place was absolutely colossal !!! Thanks for sharing and write up.

This photo that was "borrowed" blows my mind....it really does show the progression in one shot of Country to Urban to Industry *really compelling shot IMO






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goon1 


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No snitching...

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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 6 on 10/7/2019 10:12 PM >
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Great thread! I love the history and the old pictures of the place and your pictures as well. It's sad to see a place like that go, I'm bummed I never got to check it out




The Digital Cow 


Location: Maybe Birmingham, Alabama
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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 7 on 10/8/2019 3:09 AM >
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Nice thread, and historical photos. I do really like the second historical photo, and it does tell a lot about the early part of that story. I don't think I realized the extent of what happened when it was bought out by U.S. Steel, and that was an interesting part to read.

Great photos as well from your collection! The film shots are cool, and 37 looks eerie but cool. I will have to see if I can find anything from there. It is sad to see them go for sure!




Sheavy 


Location: Hoover, Alabama
Gender: Male
Total Likes: 473 likes




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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 8 on 10/8/2019 4:48 AM >
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Glad everyone has enjoyed the post.



Posted by leafloving4x4gal


This photo that was "borrowed" blows my mind....it really does show the progression in one shot of Country to Urban to Industry *really compelling shot IMO :)
434461.jpg (50 kb, 640x462)
click to view







This and the shot of the two people walking along the tracks and the Works in the background are particularly powerful for sure.



Posted by The Digital Cow


I will have to see if I can find anything from there. It is sad to see them go for sure!



Yes please!




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ThePilotGuy 


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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 9 on 10/8/2019 4:29 PM >
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Really well researched and put together. Seeing the history of a place makes it feel more alive and real to me.

Trying to find the places that the pictures were taken from, especially the historical pictures from when the plant was active, would be a cool challenge.




The only time you have too much fuel is when you're on fire.
1footinthegrave 


Location: Atlanta, GA USA
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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 10 on 10/11/2019 11:47 AM >
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Those are remarkable - heavy industry is my favorite and seems the most elusive to find in ATL anymore. They got snatched up by developers and made into high priced condos Even Cabbagetown where they tried to keep some of the worker housing (the shotgun houses) have been made into such a trendy area that no normal person can afford them.

One day students of history will be able to see these and remember what this country was founded on - heavy industry. The good, the bad and the ugly sides of it. To see nature reclaim is real art. Thank you for sharing. LOVE this kind of stuff.




2Xplorations 


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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 11 on 10/11/2019 1:53 PM >
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well done some very nice shots here




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VBJag 


Location: Oklahoma
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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 12 on 10/13/2019 8:55 AM >
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A few shots from when I last went to TCI, circa 2011-2012, and a few historical images.

For anyone interested in the history behind it, along with a ton of historical pictures, I did a write-up here: https://jondstone....ions/tciensley.php














YotaMan20 


Location: Washington
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Re: Goodbye, TCI
< Reply # 13 on 10/13/2019 8:24 PM >
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Wow RIP to this place then.
I'm glad y'all took us there - it was quite an explore.




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UER Forum > US: Southeast > Goodbye, TCI (Viewed 207 times)


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